Skip to main content

mental health mondays :: of sloth and sleep

the source of my sloth
you lucky so-and-so's. you get to have second monday. because yesterday kind of got away from me, so i figured i would just rechristen today as monday and do the whole mental health thing today. except that the fact is that i didn't use that time to prepare anything worth a damn, which is completely unforgivable since i have an armload of articles earmarked for mhm and just haven't gotten around to fleshing them out into proper blog posts yet. and no, i have no excuse for not having done that either, in case you were thinking of forgiving me.

but i found you a really adorable picture of a sloth!

anyway, as is my wont when i get lazy, i thought i'd repost a piece from 2013 that i did on mental health and insomnia. i remembered writing it, but what i didn't remember is that i wrote it on a tuesday because i'd been too tired to finish it on monday. so i'm posting an old piece on mhm on tuesday which happens to be something i originally posted on a tuesday. irony cycle complete.

i've actually been sleeping fine lately, but i thought of this post after a friend posted a link to this article [thanks, e!] on my facebook wall. it backs up something i've always suspected, which is that our bodies just aren't built to be asleep and awake in long blocks and that we'd be better off if we slept and woke in shorter blocks. specifically, segmented sleep is linked to dopamine release, dopamine being [along with serotonin and norepinephrine], part of the holy trinity of mood regulators.

and in fact, through most of history, that was precisely how people did things. however, for industrial-scale enterprises, that's a terrible model, because it would require shifts of employees staggered throughout the day and would force us to rethink just about everything in the post-industrial world we've created. yeah, we screwed ourselves good with that whole industrial revolution thing...

so here's a look back at a late mental health monday past. i'll be better next week, i promise.

*

why, you might ask, am i writing mental health mondays on a tuesday? you might just have assumed that i was being lazy yesterday and often that's exactly the reason, but this week, i have an excuse. sunday night, after a nice relaxing break from work, i had one of the worst cases of insomnia i've had in months. not that many months, mind you, because i've been blindsided by a few bouts of completely inexplicable insomnia several times in the last six months or so, where for no discernible reason, i just can't get to sleep.


sunday was bad because i actually got no sleep whatsoever. not even a nap. not even that foggy near-sleep state. around 7:30 in the morning, i started to feel like i could sleep, but nothing before then. i wasn't especially stressed about any one thing, wasn't preoccupied with a creative project, wasn't suffering the effects of medication or indigestion or experiencing rebound wakefulness after an earlier nap. in fact, i'd had a nice walk earlier in the day, i'd eaten at a reasonable hour and i gave myself time to rest in bed before turning off the lights and deciding it was time for sleep. but within about ten minutes of the lights going off, i had a horrible premonition. this isn't working it said. i could feel that i was immediately, comfortably awake. not agitated, not hyper, but awake.

insomnia is an infrequent inconvenience for most people, a somewhat more regular guest for others, but science is increasingly sounding the alarm that lack of sleep is not just something that leaves you feeling grouchy and out of sorts. it can be flat-out dangerous in both the long and short term to our psychological well-being.

you might feel that being sleep deprived makes you stupid[er]. and you'd be wrong. but it does effect your cognitive abilities, which means that while you might not know less, you're less capable of discerning how to use what you know.

although it's unlikely to happen to you, sleep deprivation has been known to trigger psychosis in people with absolutely no history of mental illness.

however, there is disturbing evidence that the chicken and egg debate about whether psychological disorders precede sleep disorders or vice versa.

there is plenty of medical evidence, of course, that sleep deprivation has a close link to mood disorders like depression and anxiety, since proper sleep allows the regulation and production of monoamines [serotonin, norepinephrine and histamine], which are in turn responsible for proper mood balance. all of the antidepressants you've ever heard of modify these particular substances [plus dopamine, but that's a different column].

so the fact is that i didn't get around to writing "mental health mondays" on monday because i was mental

Comments

as long as you're here, why not read more?

presidenting is hard :: nato

oh donald, i've been slacking on my promise to help you out with your duties as president. [yes, you may take a moment to giggle at the word "duties". but make it quick.]

it's not because i think you don't need the support; you are every bit as ignorant and inept as i'd feared/ expected and the erstwhile presence of "adults in the room" hasn't made you any better. it's just as well that you've dispatched of them. you weren't listening to what they said 95% of the time and on those few occasions when you did try to listen, you didn't understand what they were saying. increasingly, we're getting to see you for the complete intellectual non-entity you are and to see how someone who knows nothing about history, geography, culture or military tactics addresses the challenges of foreign policy.

the latest development on that front is that i've heard that you're planning on leaving nato. we all know that you've never be…

making faces :: written in the stars, in lipstick [part three]

and lo the earth has completed another journey 'round the sun, passing through all of the signs of the zodiac. well, in lipstick terms, it won't have completed its journey until later this month when it moves from capricorn to aquarius, which is where bite beauty chose to start its turn of the wheel last year. i still feel a little unnerved that they followed the calendar rather than the astrological year [which would have meant starting their astrology collection in march with the sign of aries] but i suspect that that's because their financials also follow the calendar.

after some truly infuriating times early in the calendar and collection year, bite was able to get their inventory issues sorted, which means that all four of the lipsticks reviewed here are still available through bite's website, sephora, or both. hallelujah.

i have some thoughts on the overall collection that i'll share afterwards, but let's just get started on the final four shades of the …

making faces :: written in the stars, in lipstick [part two]

it's the middle of september already? i'm not prepared for that? i mean, i am prepared for it because the heat this summer has been murder on me and i've been begging for a reprieve for months but i'm still bowled over by the speed at which time passes. this year, i've been measuring time through the launches of bite beauty's astrology collection, which arrives like the full moon once a month. [the full moon arrives every four weeks, which is less than any month except february -ed.] earlier this year, i took a look at the first four launches of the collection and already it's time to catch up with four more.

the most important thing for you to know is that after several months of problems, bite and sephora appear to have sorted out their inventory planning. for the last several releases, information has been clear and reliable as to when and where each lipstick will be available [pre-orders taken for a couple of days on bite's own website and a general…