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be converted

after the fun of our gala premiere last weekend, i'm pleased to announce that "conversion" is now available for you to watch in the comfort of your own home. we've partnered with vimeo's newly launched "on demand" service to allow viewers from all over the world to access the film from the comfort of their own homes. or wherever they feel comfortable watching movies.

see what all the fuss is about
the service is actually quite remarkable and offers a fantastic option for films that don't have backing from a major studio and which don't have the mass appeal to draw audiences to six screenings a day at five thousand multiplex screens. for five dollars [american, which is about equivalent to five dollars in most other places- canada, australia, etc.], you get access to the film for a period of six months. if you decide you really love it, you can renew it. but that's less than half the price of a ticket to a movie theatre to be able to watch the film until you can recite it for memory, like i can.

i will repeat something that i said at last week's premiere: the tools that are available to aspiring filmmakers right now are unbelievable. and by unbelievable, i mean that if you took a time machine and visited yourself ten or fifteen years ago, you'd make your young brain explode even trying to explain it. even now, most smart phones come with cameras that are more powerful than the one we used to shoot "conversion"- itself a still camera that just happens to be able to shoot high definition video. more and more i'm convinced that lists of the best films of the year will be focused less on trips to the cinema and more on what reviewers happened to find on sites like vimeo, or through services like netflix. and anyone can use something like vimeo for distribution.

we live in a remarkable world, folks.

check out and download the film here.

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