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the montreal metro project, part 4

in today's post, we're switching lines and looking at some stops on the orange line of montreal's metro system. the orange line covers a vast swath from the northwestern suburb of ville-st-laurent through multi-cultural n.d.g., the newly refurbished st-henri [formerly one of montreal's roughest neighbourhoods], on through the old city, the trendy plateau and increasingly trendy rosemont all the way up to laval, on a separate island. and the stations are as diverse as the neighbourhoods covered.

being a newer line, i do find that the stations are, on average, in better shape than the green line stations, especially those that are most used.

i'll start with some images of the abstract stained glass mural at station champs-de-mars, which is nestled inconspicuously at the entry to the old city. bustling during the summer, the station is ghostly silent once the tourists have left and so i had lots of time to take pictures. i love the panorama of the city you get through the windows.


if you've been to paris, this might look familiar. yes, that is an actual parisian metro entrance, shipped to montreal [the world's second-largest french-speaking city] as a gift. it's one of the many, many entrances to square victoria station, which is a hub located underneath the city's financial district. never go here between 4h30 and 5h30 if you can avoid it, lest you be trampled. 



here are some images of berri-uqam, the only three-line station on the system. it's a bit of a maze if you're not familiar with it, although it becomes easier once you get the hang of the criss-crossed platform design. speaking of design, the motifs in this one are kind of all over the place. it isn't ugly, by any stretch, but you can kind of tell that it was amassed in stages. needless to say, this is one of the busiest stations at all times, what with all the connecting passengers.


 



station sherbrooke is located at the south end of the plateau montreal. although i like the view of the platform, it's actually a bit on the dull side. ironically, most of the stations located in artistic, bohemian or fashion-conscious neighbourhoods tend to be a bit boring. the best stations are often in places you'd never visit...


another example of less than thrilling design, mont-royal station, the heart of the plateau, is a nondescript assemblage of brick, with a couple of minor design flourishes [like the one below]. it also happens to be one of the most frustrating stations. its kiosk has one entry point and the wind tunnel created by the doors makes them very difficult to open. when you get them open, you can feel the massive wind gusts pressing you back all the way downstairs. the kiosk underwent massive renovations and it hasn't helped anything.


rosemont metro, located just north of the plateau, is actually quite lovely. it's not really convenient to much, which is a drag, because more people should see it. i love the cream-black-orange colour scheme and the giant vaulted interior. the area is so large that even a fairly loud conversation sounds like little echoing phantom whispers from any distance. 



more to come...

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