Skip to main content

save me

amidst the agonisingly detailed and yet strangely uninformative coverage of this afternoon's airline crash in the hudson river, i've heard a refrain that never ceases to grate on my nerves.

repeatedly, the announcers on the news marveled at the "miracle" that the plane landed and that no one was killed. that this happened is no doubt remarkable, but to say it's a miracle is to denigrate the work of the pilot, co-pilot and crew who were actually responsible for the plane's landing and for getting the passengers out of the plane to be rescued. pilots are trained for this kind of thing, but landing a passenger plane on a narrow strip of water between two densely populated metropolises goes well beyond what any training program could cover.

if i wake up tomorrow and find out that the entire crew passed out before landing and that the plane guided itself by chance to the hudson, then, i will agree, that is something that could be deemed miraculous. because in that case, it would have happened without any attempt at intervention and direction. but as it stands, there was quite clearly a reason why events unfolded the way that they did, which does not require recourse to divine intervention.

to be fair, there has been plenty of praise given to the pilot, but why not leave it at that? he did something remarkable and deserves recognition. end transmission.

Comments

as long as you're here, why not read more?

eat the cup 2018 :: welcome, comrades!

even regular followers of this blog might be surprised to learn that the longest-standing tradition on more like space is not tied to politics, makeup, mental health or even writing, but sport. i started the quadrennial eat the cup "challenge" [in quotes because i'm not actually challenging anyone but myself] way back in 2006 as a way of combining my growing love of soccer, my love for cooking and my still-new blogging habit. i determined that, as i followed the world cup, i would cook dinners to honour the winners of different games, meaning that the meal would, as far as possible, feature traditional dishes from those nations. in subsequent iterations, i started to do dishes that were combinations of different winners from the same day or, as the competition wore on, combinations of the different combatants.

finding certain ingredients can be a challenge, even in a diverse city like montreal [and i live on the cusp of some of its most diverse neighbourhoods], but what…

making faces :: a lip for all seasons [summer edition]

this may seem like an odd time to think about summer, but not to think about coolness. it can be hard to wrap your head around the idea that summer is considered "cool" in colour analysis terms and, in my opinion, reads as the coolest of the cool, because everything in it is touched with the same chilly grey. winter may have the coldest colours, but its palette is so vivid that it distracts the eye. everything in summer is fresh and misty, like the morning sky before the sun breaks through. in my original post on the season, i compared it to monet's paintings of waterlilies at his garden in giverny and, if i do say so, i think that's an apt characterisation.

finding lip colours touched with summer grey and blue is, as you might expect, kind of tricky. the cosmetic world seems obsessed with bringing warmth, which doesn't recognise that some complexions don't support it well. [also, different complexions support different kinds of warmth, but that's another…

making faces :: divine inspiration

several months ago, kat von d announced that she was doing a palette and lipstick inspired by divine. for many gen x'ers like me, divine was our introduction to the world of drag and, possibly, to the idea of transgenderism. now, divine wasn't transgender; he was a gay man who lived his celebrity life in drag, but seeing him still put the idea of the transgender person in the public mind. to this day, he's frequently mistaken for a trans woman. [side note :: as a "drag" artist, divine did not do impersonations of female stars, which is usually associated with drag performances. his character was all his own.]

divine came to his stardom through the films of john waters, the king of trash cinema who worked with a troupe of actors and filmmakers [dubbed "dreamland studios"] in all of his early films. if the broader public has heard of any of his films, it's mostly likely hairspray, which was then made into a hit broadway musical, then back into a film …