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eat the cup, part 11: fratugal

that word looks vaguely rude, i must say.

i don't know how i've avoided touching on the cuisine of a country virtually synonymous with gastronomy for the entire tournament, but tonight is france's night up, with a little help from portugal. tonight is bouillabaisse night chez kate. long one of my very favourite dishes, i chose to include not only the traditional fish, tomatoes and truckloads of garlic, but also a little bit of portuguese chorico, a few sardines and a little paprika and cloves (key flavours in their cuisine, apparently). the result is quite enjoyable, a little heavier than usual (blame the sausage) and (don't tell any famous french chefs) pretty simple to prepare.

today's ride home was surprisingly restrained. aside from a handful of chefs with michelin stars and a lot of wine, the french don't seem to have exported themselves (quebec aside) in the same way as the italians and the portuguese. (i should also add that one frenchman i met denied any knowledge of exported french wines, saying he wouldn't touch the stuff they let out of the country). on the way home, there was only one truck, granted with about 700 small flags, out to support the winning side.

in a way, i dislike today's results. i don't have strong feelings about the teams, but i was looking forward to two things:

1. if france had lost, they would have had to play germany in the so-called "third place" match (also known as the "who shall retain a shred of dignity" match), which would doubtless have set up some war-related malapropisms in the next day's headlines.

2. if portugal had won, i would have been able to get front row seats for canada's first civil war, at ground zero (also known as college street). italian restaurants smashed up against portuguese groceries, the scene heavy with barely restrained pandemonium.

as it is, the final two games are setting up some interesting culinary challenges. for portugal versus germany, it may be hard to get the flavours to mesh together. for italy versus france, i may just eat some garlic and be done with it.

Comments

My favourite compromise of french-italian fusion is to blend pizza with pissaladiere, that is, to replace the ubiquous tomato sauce with slowly caramelized oignons in olive oil, the rest as standard pizza.
Yummy!
flora_mundi said…
oooohh! i like it! better than eating garlic, anyway.
I'd recommend adding a splash of balsamic vinegar towards the end of the oignons cooking to give a bit of color.

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