Skip to main content

clowns to the left of me, jokers to the right

i've never been a fan of "political correctness". in fact, when i was more actively involved in social causes, i used to get a bit of a cheap thrill by baiting the sort of people who insisted that all evils in the world could be eliminated if we simply imposed restrictions on acceptable language and shamed anyone who didn't share our views.

i worked in an atmosphere that had a lot of that element to it and was routinely put down, sadly by other women, as a "bad feminist" because of the fact that i wore dresses and make-up and didn't apologise for it (feminist don't wear fishnets...), ignoring a lot of the more meaningful parts of my life and personality in favour of what they could see on the surface. so i know what it feels like to be on the receiving end of a politically correct diatribe and i don't have a lot of patience for it.

that said, now that i'm out in the "real" world (as opposed to an overly academic, self-reflecting dream-world), i am starting to notice a lot of the things that got these people so riled up to begin with. i was speaking to a couple of co-workers today and both of them, one of them a pretty senior person, were going on at some length about how they only wanted to have men as bosses, not women. i was pretty clear that i thought it was stupid to make assumptions based on gender either way (i've had bad bosses of both sexes), which immediately gets me branded as some political correct language cop cracking down on them for expressing opinions (it's amazing how many people equate challenging an opinion with challenging their right to hold that opinion).

how did i end up on the wrong end of both sides of this debate? i don't care what anyone says, it is asinine in this day and age to talk about women and men as somehow homogeneous groups (whether you're judging them from the left or the right). although this is common sense to me, it's apparently heresy to most individuals, who are afraid to disturb the convenient little compartments into which they place everybody. (i will also add that i think this is especially an issue with gender. i don't believe that it would have been considered acceptable for a co-worker to say she didn't want to work for anyone who was black, for instance, although i'm sure there are people who do say such things.)

although this has been in my mind today, it's something i've noticed a lot and on an ongoing basis. on the one hand, i detest it when anyone cries out that they're a victim every time someone says something that hurts their feelings. on the other hand, i hear enough stupid statements about others based on broad stereotypes, mostly from people who should know better, that i also understand the urge to yell.

and here i am, arguing with both sides and wondering why people are so hung up on maintaining their preconceived notions, even in the face of evidence that those notions have lost whatever marginal usefulness they might have had. i believe it was shaw who said that common sense was the least common of all senses. it's a statement that unfortunately seems to gain currency over time.

Comments

Andrew Evans said…
This is a great blog! I suggest you read Daphne Patei's book "Heterophobia" She is a gender studies professer in the states who seams to have a similair perspective to you when it comes to "identity politics". I am a straight, white male who performs stand up comedy. Challenging opinions held by women on stage is death to someone like me. I am not allowed to have opinions about women, unless they are positive, or men are ultimately to blame. I do not go out of my way to make fun of women, but if I see a hypocrisy withing the feminist movement or something that just doesn't make sense to me, I would like to voice it. Keep challenging those opinions, the world needs you to do it!
Andrew Evans
www.angryandrew.com
flora_mundi said…
haven't ever been shy about the opinions, so please drop by any time...

i can't help but notice that a disproportionate number of us common sense types seem to come from or have lived in halifax... must be all the extra fluoride in the water down there.

as long as you're here, why not read more?

dreamspeak

ok, so i've been lax about posting here. i apologise. there are reasons. i don't know if they'ree good reasons, but they include:


i've had a lot of work to do, which is nice because i'm a freelancer and things tend to slow down in the summer, so the more work i get now, the less i have to worry about later [in theory].i started watching the handmaid's tale. i was a little hesitant because i didn't actually like the novel very much; i found it heavy-handed and predictable. the series relies on the novel for about 80% of its first season plot but i nevertheless find it spellbinding. where i felt that the novel beat readers with its politics, the series does a better job of connecting with the humanity in the midst of politics. i'm dithering on starting season two because i am a serial binger and once i know damn well that starting the second season will soon consign me to the horrors of having to wait a week between episodes. i don't know if i can han…

i agree, smedley [or, smokers totally saved our planet in 1983]

so this conversation happened [via text, so i have evidence and possibly so does the canadian government and the nsa].

dom and i were trying to settle our mutual nerves about tomorrow night's conversion screening, remembering that we've made a fine little film that people should see. which is just about exactly what dom had said when i responded thusly:

me :: i agree smedley. [pauses for a moment] did you get that here?

dom :: no?

me :: the aliens who were looking at earth and then decided it wasn't worth bothering with because people smoked even though it was bad for them?
come to think of it, that might mean that smokers prevented an alien invasion in the seventies.

dom :: what ?!?!?

me :: i've had wine and very little food. [pause] but the alien thing was real. [pause.] well, real on tv.

dom :: please eat something.

of course, i was wrong. the ad in question ran in 1983. this is the part where i would triumphantly embed the ad from youtube, except that the governmen…

mental health mondays :: separate and not equal

given the ubiquitousness of racial disparities in the united states, there's no reason why we should be surprised that they exist in mental health care. unlike a lot of other areas, the people in power have acknowledged the problem for decades. but the situation isn't getting any better. 
the united states surgeon general documented the differences between white and non-white mental health care back in 2001 so we can assume that it was already a known problem at that point. two years later, a presidential commission said the same damn thing and groups like the national association for mental health seized on this to develop guidelines on how to bridge the ethnic gap. from the turn of the century through 2007, the number of papers and publications talking about the mental health care gap spiked. the issue was viewed as being on par with obesity when it came to urgent problems.

starting in 2004, researchers undertook a massive project that involved the records of nearly a quart…