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mental health mondays :: coming soon

i've had a lot of requests to bring this feature back, as in really back, on a weekly basis, not just when i feel like it, or when something in particular catches my interest. and the truth is that i miss writing about all sorts of crazy, whether its my own or other people's or ideas about it or anything that's related, really. and my past posts do continue to generate a surprising number of views. so, this is my way of saying that, yes, i will be bringing back mental health mondays and i will be making every attempt to keep it on a regular schedule.

since the subject has been of interest to me for a long time, i've continued to keep up with developments, which means that i have a fair number of things that it's occurred to me to write on. and since i tend to be lazy and disorganised about things related to this blog, i'm making this post rather than diving right in with a post on the subject of mental health in order to give myself time to go through the things i've accumulated and get a solid subject for "the great return post that i find intimidating to think about in advance".

in fact, mental health mondays isn't the only thing that i miss. the regularly scheduled posts were generally a treat to work on, but between mental health, under-reported stories from around the world, and paranoid theories, the research schedule got a bit too heavy for me to handle and still make money. [of course, when people click that happy donation button above and to the right, it makes it that much easier for me to justify writing/ researching.]

i will at some point find a way to fit all the things that i'd like to do here without compromising my ability [and dom's] to live and eat, but until i figure that one out, i have to choose my battles. the battle i'm choosing for the time being is to bring back mental health mondays, starting next week, january 15th. [which, on a completely unrelated note, is martin luther king jr. day. grotesquely, it's also robert e. lee day in some states. who the hell made that schedule?]

if you're unfamiliar with mhm, you can find out more by clicking on the label tag below. if you are familiar, and have an idea for something you'd like me to cover, please feel free to drop me a line at kate[at]fsquaredmedia[dot]net.

onward and upward, probably in a loopy pattern, but with some measure of momentum.

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jihadvertising?

i keep seeing this ad for tictac candies:



am i the only one who finds the suicide bomber clown at the end a little unnerving? all the nice natural things like the bunny and the [extinct] woolly mammoth and the fruit get devoured by a trying-to-appear-nonthreatening-but-obviously-psychotic clown who then blows himself up. congratulations, tictac, i think this ad has landed you on about a dozen watch lists.

oh and by the way, showing me that your product will somehow cause my stomach to explode in a rainbow of wtf makes me believe that doing consuming tictacs would be a worse dietary decision than the time i ate two raw eggs and a half a bottle of hot sauce on a dare.

mental health mondays :: employee of the month

one of the things that makes mental health difficult to manage is that it can be difficult to tell which are the symptoms and which are the root causes of a disorder. another is that sometimes the symptoms can disguise themselves as things we normally value. both of those things collided for me reading this piece in the atlantic, which deals with the possibility that work addiction may be a coping mechanism employed by people with post-traumatic stress disorder.

the idea isn't particularly farfetched; after all, 52% of men and 28% of women with ptsd will at some time in their lives meet the clinical criteria for addiction. and ptsd is often first identified through habits linked to displaced anxiety. and what gets linked to anxiety more than a demanding job? but drawing the line between the two isn't quite as easy as it looks.

work addiction isn't accepted as an addiction disorder in the way that alcoholism and drug addiction are. that makes it a little difficult to talk …

mental health mondays :: the dangers of diagnosing

when you take a look at any reputable online source of information about mental health, it comes with a warning that anything you read on the site should not be considered a substitute for evaluation by a medical professional. so why are so many people jumping on the bandwagon to diagnose donald trump?

it's not uncommon for people to make glib judgments about the mental health of others, because we think that we understand what disorders entail. when i was working in offices, i noticed a lot of this: an immature and garrulous employee being labeled and partially excused because others were certain he had adhd, or a moody and indecisive boss dismissed as bipolar. [as you can imagine, that one struck me as particularly ignorant and, since i was the audience, ironic.] but in the case of trump, even professionals are weighing in on the subject. no fewer than twenty-seven psychiatrists have collaborated on a book called the dangerous case of donald trump. up to now, it's been unde…