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making faces :: inspired by some mighty girls

some of you may already have heard this, but the journal of medical ethics recently had what can only be described as an epic brain fart when it published an article by white, male american doctor allan jacobs advocating for a "compromise solution" on the issue of female genital mutilation [fgm]. i'm not sure what the temperature was in his office when he was writing this missive, but i can only assume it was pretty fucking warm and that he was in the preliminary stages of a drop in blood pressure associated with extreme temperatures, which diminishes the brain's ability to make complex decisions and think clearly.

his case was that little progress had been made in eliminating fgm in thirty years [although, as this riposte points out, the issue really hasn't been addressed until the last decade in any meaningful way]. therefore, he says, western doctors should feel comfortable with "milder forms" of mutilation, so as not to appear to judge a cultural tradition. i'm not sure what part of cutting off a clitoris qualifies as mild. even typing the words makes me squirmy.

look, i'm all in favour of cultural sensitivity and being respectful of the traditions of others, but that doesn't mean that all cultural traditions deserve to be continued; as a white person, i can claim that slave ownership is a cultural tradition; as someone of british heritage, i can claim that taking over someone else's territory is a cultural tradition; as a scot, i can claim that murdering leaders when they need to be replaced is a cultural tradition. but as a human being living in the twenty-first century, i can say that i don't believe that any of those traditions should be respected. i don't even think they should be legal. i know that there are grey areas, but can we just agree that any practice that ends with a person missing a functional and helpful part of their body is probably something that we shouldn't be going to the wall to protect?

luckily for all of us, dr. jacobs was called out by a group of young women and men in the most adorable way one could conceive: a catchy little ditty sung with plaintive voices and played with sincerity. [thus marking the only time "adorable" and "female genital mutilation" will ever collide in public parlance.]



i absolutely love everything about this video, but one of my favourite things is the sugary sweet look the youngsters are all [female and male] sporting. so, when i got the idea that i wanted to post the video to call it to your attention, i thought it would be fun to recreate a version of the makeup they used, which somehow channels pure fun while dealing with a subject that's anything but.

since everyone in the video clearly had that youthful radiance to them, i went with my handy-dandy joe fresh illuminating primer [although i just mixed it in with my foundation]. i just don't glow like that anymore without help.

clearly, the looks are all about da pink, sometimes on the eyes and sometimes on the lips, but i just said "screw it" and did both. i combined a lot of mac eye shadows to get that medium-to-slightly-cool pink that most of the young women are wearing, including a couple of limited edition products. i found "sushi flower" was too warm and coral on its own, so i topped it with "sunset b" and added the cooler, more violet-fuchsia "lala" on the outside of the eyes. then i tapped "swish" on the centre to give a bit of a highlight. that list bit is a departure from what you see in the video, because the makeup they've used is quite matte. i think that you could probably achieve something similar with just "sushi flower" and "swish", but if you wanted a cooler medium pink to combine, i think that mac "cherry topped" would work.

along with the pink, i noticed one woman who was wearing bright yellow shadow, so i decided to incorporate that as well with the pink, in the crease. i also added some black eyeliner, which, along with combining colours, is different than what's in the video, but was necessary to make the look just a little less "editorial" and more wearable when i went out to the grocery store later on.

the cheeks in the video are pretty subtle, so i just dabbed a little colour and highlighter on: more glow and not quite as drastic looking as no blush at all [which i considered].

as far as the lip, in my collection "candy yum yum" was the hands-down choice in terms of colour. it really is the perfect, bright, candy pink. i wouldn't even be surprised if it was one of the colours used in the video. bite "cotton candy" would be another good choice. if you're the kind of person who wears cooler pinks well, i think mac "st. germain" or "pink nouveau" would be nice options from that family [although lighter]. bold fuchsia looked too red, and competed too much with the eye.

it's not a look that lends itself to being tamped down, but if you wanted to try something more subtle, i'd drop "bright sunshine" [the yellow shade] in favour of something yellow-toned but softer and apply the pinks with a lighter hand. on the lips, you could opt for bite "dragonfruit" which is still pretty bright, but a bit deeper and more muted, or a warm pink like mac "chatterbox".




here's what i used to look that way ::

the base ::
clarins skin illusion natural radiance light reflecting foundation 103
clarins instant concealer 01
joe fresh illuminating primer "pure glow"
guerlain pressed meteorites 01 "clair"

the eyes ::
mac "sushi flower"
mac "sunset b"*
mac "lala"*
mac "swish"
mac "bright sunshine"
mac "vanilla"
marc jacobs highliner gel crayon e/l "blacquer"
colour pop e/l "exit"
marc jacobs velvet noir major volume mascara

the cheeks ::
tarte cheek stain "flush"
guerlain pressed powder "parure de nuit"*

lips ::
mac matte l/s "candy yum yum"

*indicates a limited edition or discontinued product.

i apologise for the quality of those photos, by the way. the battery for my regular camera has given up the ghost, which means i've had to resort to phone photos. they look decent enough small. maybe don't click on them.

those weird faces i'm making were completely unintentional, by the way. i have no idea what was going through my head, other than that catchy little song.

so remember:

1. not all traditions are worth saving.
2. the female clitoris is not something other people should be making decisions about.
3. cutting off parts of someone's body without their informed consent is just bad.

you can find out more about the group that put that lovely video together right here. [and make a donation to help fund their work.]

Comments

LadyJicky said…
I loved the video too..... it should be shown to all high school students . Education is the way! Love your Candy Yum Yum .... must go to a MAC counter today.... well that is a thought - MAC should do something and collect / donate to this cause! Its all about Girl Power!!!
Kate MacDonald said…
That is a great idea for Mac- donate CYY proceeds to the cause. I honestly just about fell off my chair when I heard an actual OBGYN advocating for this, but I guess weird opposition can come from anywhere.

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