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Showing posts from March, 2016

worldwide wednesdays :: no, it isn't

it's been a while! honestly, my time has been tight enough that posts that require more research, like www and paranoid theory, have had to be sacrificed. that makes me a little unhappy, because there are all sorts of awesome things about the world [and about paranoia] that could do with some explaining. but in the wake of the terror attacks in belgium and the media reaction to it, i couldn't help but return to the world of worldwide wednesdays in order to give some background that just isn't coming out through most other channels.

that's not to say that this information isn't out there. it's actually a little embarrassing how quickly i was able to assemble both primary sources and corroboration, but somehow, this is all getting glossed over, despite the fact that these attacks have been given nearly round the clock coverage on major news networks [*cough* cnn *cough*]. we hear about "poor communication" between belgian authorities and their counterp…

move over

a little earlier today, dom sent me this video with an unhappy emoticon and a lot of swearing.



if you're judging us for using emoticons and swearing to express a reaction to that news story, i would suggest:

a. that you run away from this blog as fast as your fingers will carry you, because it's roughly indicative of the level of sensitivity i display at all times.

b. that you understand that we've had to develop a sort of shorthand for dealing with the eruption of thoughts and feelings that these things evoke, because if we didn't, we'd spend the entire day talking of nothing else.

clearly, the spectacle of anyone in north america telling immigrants to "go back where they came from" is ridiculous and hypocritical. even the most "canadian" white person likely can't go back more than two or three generations without losing at least part of their "canadian-ness" and even those who can point to a few genetic strands that have been bo…

mental health mondays :: babble on

one of the things that i've rarely addressed on mental health mondays [and never in any meaningful detail] is the subject of what happens to our brains as we age. even those of us who are lucky enough to go through their lives without falling victim, even temporarily, to a mental illness [and that does still constitute a majority of us], have to accept that, as we age, we can lose a considerable amount of our cognitive functions. that can mean simply being confused, or struggling to find the right words, to bouts of dementia, to full-on alzheimer's disease.

we avoid calling these mental disorders, because they are accepted as a "natural" part of aging. that's just what happens to our brains. except that's not true. the more we study the brain, the more that we discover what's considered "natural" may actually be a byproduct of what we consider "normal" and should by no means be considered as a given. there are things that can keep the …

making faces :: whispers of spring

spring still is not upon us for another few days, but spring makeup collections have been upon us for a while now. in fact, i first encountered yves st. laurent's "boho stones" spring collection while i was finishing my christmas shopping, which should warrant a ticket or something. i mean, telling canadians that spring is right around the corner in december qualifies as at least mildly offensive.

nonetheless, i was entranced by the marbled packaging and sweet, fresh, spring-like colours, so it was only a matter of time until i gave in to temptation. of course, it's been a matter of more time that i've been meaning to get around to writing this review, but that's at least partly because i've had very narrow windows in which to get decent swatch photographs because montreal doesn't get a lot of light in the middle of winter. [although, to be fair, it's been brighter than average this year, especially compared to last. but it doesn't stay bright…

a little irish in me

today is the day when we all throw on some green and pretend to be a little irish in order to stake their claim to cheap beer and to honour their fake ancestors by passing out in a pool of their own urine by eight o'clock. godspeed you, little irish wannabes, it's taken centuries of regular gorging to get our livers this resilient. this isn't just something that you develop over the course of a few hours, once a year. but your effort is adorable. at least, it's adorable as long as i don't catch you peeing in my yard. that's the moment at which you get introduced to the irish temper.

of course, if you're white, or have some white ancestry, chances are you might actually be a little irish, because those genes got everywhere, especially in america, but in most former british colonies. in fact, st. patrick's day is a bigger deal in the new world than in ireland itself, owing to the fact that it was the day in which immigrants [who were often closer to the …

mental health mondays :: guess again

over the last few weeks, while i was busy writing up posts on the issues surrounding post-traumatic stress disorder, something scary happened in the world of psychology. if you follow developments in the field, chances are that you've heard about this already, but if not, let me clue you in: it turns out that one of the foundational studies in behavioural science may well be complete hooey.

the theory, which has been taken as gospel for so long that it forms the basis of later psychological work, stems from an experiment done by two scientists on a group of university students two decades ago [which isn't really that long ago at all, but when you consider the advances made in psychology during that time, it might as well have been in the stone age]. the experiment falls into the "kinda of douche-y but not dangerous" category, so we're not talking about mk-ultra here. you can read about it in the excellent article linked above, or you can read my paltry summation…

questions someone needs to ask hillary clinton

part of the problem with following politics of any kind is having to watch hours of television interviews, desperately waiting to see one or two particular questions asked and just never having it happen.

all candidates seem to get away with softball questions, or avoiding something that should be obvious. there are candidates who get a free ride from certain networks, but there are some who manage to slide by just because people seem to miss the important things in their policies or history. 
i feel like hillary clinton is both lucky and unlucky in this regard, because too many reporters are obsessed with what are really sideshow issues. is there really any point to asking a candidate why they are trustworthy when voters don't think she is? instead, it would make sense to ask her tough questions but ones where her answers would give meaningful insight into her character and her motivations. 
so here are a few questions that i think i'd like to hear the former first lady, sen…

making faces :: women's rites

the magic of the internet, specifically the magic of instagram, recently brought me in contact with rituelle de fille, a new brand [launched in 2014] and completely new to me, although some of their products have apparently received plaudits from the media. their branding reminds me very much of the early years of illamasqua: a well-edited collection of colour products [there are no base or complexion products as of yet, except blush] with an emphasis on including shades that are daring and unexpected. 

i picked up three products, which are offered individually or as a set, as the "fleur sauvage" collection, inspired by "lush overgrowth, the deadly allure of carnivorous plants, and the strange chromatic language whispered between flowers and pollinators". there is no price difference between buying the items separately or individually, it's just a matter of selected partnering [and i believe all three products were launched together in spring 2015]. there are tw…

mental health mondays :: something to remember

this is the third and final chapter in our look at post-traumatic stress disorder. having looked at the condition and its different forms over the last two weeks, i thought it was an appropriate time to look at one of the most controversial things associated with it: the phenomenon of recovered memory.

it is not uncommon for people suffering from ptsd to have amnesia. in order to cope with memories that are "too much" for it to process, the brain dissociates them from the rest of its contents, locking them away and stuffing the key somewhere conscious you can't find it. as you might have guessed, this is something related to other dissociative disorders, all of which stem from your brain considering something and deciding you'd be better off without it, either temporarily or permanently.

dissociative amnesia is not the same as post-traumatic amnesia, which is another type of amnesia, borne of a traumatic event, but where the memory loss is caused by physical damage t…

how low can you go?

i've been a little strapped for blogging time this week, but if you've been wondering where i've been, you need only click on the link to my twitter account to find out. for some reason, this week has been replete with things that demanded my attention, allowing only short pauses for the release of venom and frustration [in increments of 140 characters or less]. but whatever else i might have on my plate, there was no way i was going to pass up the opportunity to say a few words about last night's republican "presidential" candidates' debate. however, i then realised that punk poet laureates dayglo abortions had already said the words i had in mind:



within minutes of turning on my television set, donald trump was there reassuring the nation that there's nothing wrong with his penis size. dom and i sort of looked at each other, dumbfounded, as the most embarrassing campaign for a presidential nomination managed to crash through a few more levels of sh…