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making faces :: this one's for you, america

yes, today i did a special "american election look", something i hope i don't regret later on...

first up, there's the obligatory red, white and blue.


that's a bright, bold red because what is america if not bold and brash? [guerlain rouge parade]


and that's some white, which is for the stars in your flag, but also for the suffragettes who fought for women's right to vote a hundred years ago. but there's black too, because black lives matter and the experience of blacks in america is an intrinsic part of who america is. [skirt annie thompson]


and some blue in both the camisole and the earrings [although i grant that the earrings don't really register. it's a dark blue, because let's face it: you know i'm hoping that's what your electoral map is going to look like tomorrow. [earrings joe fresh, camisole h+m]

but that's not all there is...




that's a nice helping of purple, in honour of all those purple states that are going to be deciding this election. [nars demon lover]


some flat, comfortable shoes for standing in line at the voting locations, or for marching on washington if these numbskulls don't work hard enough at making things better. [shoes john fluevog]



and finally, yes, that is a rosary slung round my erstwhile agnostic neck, because tonight requires a couple of prayers, and because i think that the pope has had some very insightful comments about americans' tendency to pick and choose parts of the bible that inform their faith. 

but there's more to it than that: i bought that rosary at the cathedral of notre dame de paris. france, like you guys, adopted the red, white and blue as their colours, just a few years after your revolution. and they assigned meanings to those colours: white for the clergy, blue for the bourgeoisie, red for the nobility, because everyone was supposed to work together. but the three colours have also become associated with the three objectives of their revolution: liberty, equality, fraternity. ["equality", by the way, meant equality of opportunity, not of result.] that spirit of togetherness had some rough times, to the point where different factions would just claim their own part of it and fly flags of one of the three colours, but never the other two. the flag, and the country, got torn apart and put back together for some time. 

after today's exercise in electoral liberty, which is the one truly equal process in a modern democracy- one person, one vote- things will change. it's impossible not to notice that things in america have become heated and angry and divided, but here's hoping that, in the wake of what's been an ugly, dispiriting and downright frightening campaign, you can all pull together in that spirit of fraternity the french were so big on. 

Comments

SoSuSam said…
Thank you for celebrating our election sartorially and cosmetically. As you now know, the blue in your outfit and earrings was not particularly reflected in our electoral map. Like, barely at all. And the red that sprawled across the map wasn't the bright, bold rouge of your Guerlain, but rather the bumpy irritation of some kind of rash you'd rather not admit, even to a doctor, you have. (Not you! But, er, someone who's been hanging out with the wrong crowd *cough* Trump.) Well, here's to the U.S. someday regaining the diversity and spirit you embraced in your outfit. :) For now, I'm going to take a page from the French book of separatism and hang a blue-only flag from my window.
Kate MacDonald said…
Wow. I am very honoured to have inspired you :-)

The election night was flat-out painful for me, even though it's not my country, because, as a woman, I'd like to think that a man who's shown a pattern of disrespect, a man about to go to court for raping a thirteen year-old girl, would be unacceptable as a candidate. Not so.

Now I just have to think of a makeup look that encompasses hope and the struggle for something better...
SoSuSam said…
Ah...I wrote a long response to your comment, which Blogger ate. Maybe that's for the best. So I'll just say two things: First, I look forward to your look encompassing "hope and the struggle for something better." Second, I feel your pain (as HRC's hubby used to say) over DT's election, and am heartbroken that 53% of American white women voted for him. How could they? (I am one; but I certainly didn't tick the box for him.) Not only is his lack of respect (such a gracious way of putting it!) for women appalling, his running mate's radically conservative views are going to turn back the clock in terms of women's rights--and human rights overall. It's going to be a very ugly 4 years, with repercussions that last for decades. Not to mention the repercussions we're feeling here already in the form of escalating violence toward minorities of every stripe. Hmmm...this didn't end up being a short rant after all! Sorry...

as long as you're here, why not read more?

dreamspeak

ok, so i've been lax about posting here. i apologise. there are reasons. i don't know if they'ree good reasons, but they include:


i've had a lot of work to do, which is nice because i'm a freelancer and things tend to slow down in the summer, so the more work i get now, the less i have to worry about later [in theory].i started watching the handmaid's tale. i was a little hesitant because i didn't actually like the novel very much; i found it heavy-handed and predictable. the series relies on the novel for about 80% of its first season plot but i nevertheless find it spellbinding. where i felt that the novel beat readers with its politics, the series does a better job of connecting with the humanity in the midst of politics. i'm dithering on starting season two because i am a serial binger and once i know damn well that starting the second season will soon consign me to the horrors of having to wait a week between episodes. i don't know if i can han…

i agree, smedley [or, smokers totally saved our planet in 1983]

so this conversation happened [via text, so i have evidence and possibly so does the canadian government and the nsa].

dom and i were trying to settle our mutual nerves about tomorrow night's conversion screening, remembering that we've made a fine little film that people should see. which is just about exactly what dom had said when i responded thusly:

me :: i agree smedley. [pauses for a moment] did you get that here?

dom :: no?

me :: the aliens who were looking at earth and then decided it wasn't worth bothering with because people smoked even though it was bad for them?
come to think of it, that might mean that smokers prevented an alien invasion in the seventies.

dom :: what ?!?!?

me :: i've had wine and very little food. [pause] but the alien thing was real. [pause.] well, real on tv.

dom :: please eat something.

of course, i was wrong. the ad in question ran in 1983. this is the part where i would triumphantly embed the ad from youtube, except that the governmen…

mental health mondays :: separate and not equal

given the ubiquitousness of racial disparities in the united states, there's no reason why we should be surprised that they exist in mental health care. unlike a lot of other areas, the people in power have acknowledged the problem for decades. but the situation isn't getting any better. 
the united states surgeon general documented the differences between white and non-white mental health care back in 2001 so we can assume that it was already a known problem at that point. two years later, a presidential commission said the same damn thing and groups like the national association for mental health seized on this to develop guidelines on how to bridge the ethnic gap. from the turn of the century through 2007, the number of papers and publications talking about the mental health care gap spiked. the issue was viewed as being on par with obesity when it came to urgent problems.

starting in 2004, researchers undertook a massive project that involved the records of nearly a quart…