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i finally remembered to put a title here

lulu is not the world's best assistant...
[i don't know why it took me so long to notice this, but i published this post without a title. so now i've given it a title. a silly title, to be sure, but i revel in the frequent silliness of my blog post titles.]

this post as a little bit of everything, i suppose...

1. i figured that the donald and his cornsilk cotton candy hair had assaulted our eyes long enough, so i have switched up the featured post. i delved back into the semi-defunct worldwide wednesdays archive and pulled out this post on the so-called "arab world", because i do think that it's an area of confusion for many people, including me from time to time. and, yes, i have to admit that the donald once again influenced the choice with his comments about conducting "extreme vetting" ["enhanced" would probably have been a better choice of word, except that dick cheney and the cia ruined it for all of us] on some prospective immigrants or visitors to the united states. i'll be talking about the idea of "exporters of terror" in another post, but, even if we believe that trump means muslims, or arabs, or people from certain countries, even that definition could cause confusion. having an opinion about "certain areas of the world" is one thing, but policy is built on specifics and if and when trump gets in office, he's going to have to grapple with the reality of narrowing his focus to the point where it can be used by thousands of employees around the nation in a consistent way. i'm offering this piece as an example of the complexities of even defining the word "arab" in a way that incorporates our understanding of the word and offers some other possibilities.

2. a friend posted this article on my facebook wall today, which is one of the best pieces i've ever read about the strange intricacies of english. i had written something about this myself a while back, but this one is way better, if for no other reason than it has examples. [and while english has a lot of different accents and dialects, the same is true of most other languages in europe and around the world, so my idea that the accents and dialects themselves are a signal of english's unique weirdness is misguided.] our essential theses, however, are the same: english is a uniquely perverse language because it is a hodgepodge of other languages. i'm happy to have a more informed person back me up on that.

3. several people have sent me articles and suggested topics for mental health mondays and i want to thank you very much for doing so. suggestions like this make it so much easier for me to focus, plus it's an opportunity to work on something i know you guys want to read. as always, you can contact me with any ideas you'd like me to cover. [well, within the range of topics i usually cover on the blog. ask me for an opinion piece on nascar and it's going to be a short read.] mental health mondays will return on september 5th, well-rested and ready to take on the big, crazy world.

4. i haven't posted music lately. here is some music. i'm sad that the opportunities to dj around here have dried up, because i miss doing it, but that doesn't mean i'm any less interested in music itself, or that i'm not constantly finding things that tickle my proverbial fancy. [where is one's fancy located, exactly? no, wait. i don't think i want to know.]

i know very little about snowbeasts except that i really like what they've heard. their newest release is a compilation of tracks recorded from 2014-16, but this is one from their last "proper" album.



tracks that are "ethnically influenced" too often reek of appropriation, but sikhara seem to have walked the walk, living as a self-described nomad for years and producing something that bears the imprints of that experience, rather than just borrowing from a particular culture. sadly seems to have disappeared since 2013.



stclvr is another one of those mysterious american artists i stumbled across on bandcamp. definitely interesting for fans of early haus arafna, although it might even be harsher than that. eek.



thanks, as always, for coming by this space. i would invite you all out for coffee and chats if i could. 

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as long as you're here, why not read more?

don't speak

you might think that it sounds dramatic, but linguistic genocide is something that happens. people in power will go to great lengths to eradicate certain languages, not just for the sheer joy of making the world a lesser place, but as a way of beating down the culture that's associated with it. language has a unique reciprocal bond with culture, and every group that has attempted to break down another has recognised that forbidding a cultural group from communicating in their own language is an extremely effective way to tear apart their culture.

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