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mental health mondays :: i want to play a game

every so often on mental health mondays, i like to do a little post on different quizzes that are available online for evaluating your own mental health. of course, none of these tests should constitute a medical diagnosis, the only way to know if you have a mental disorder is for a professional to examine you and determine that you do. however, these quizzes do allow you to evaluate symptoms you might be experiencing. some of them are obviously [i hope] more reliable than others, so adjust your expectations accordingly.

the psychology today mental health assessment

this one is pretty basic, but is also a good overview of symptoms for many common mental disorders. it doesn't address mood disorders at all, nor does it address schizophrenia or bipolar type i. however, it does provide a decent way of evaluating where on the spectrum you fall in terms of stress level, depression level and your propensity to panic.

since i'm a pretty open psychological book, i figured i'd share my results.


i'm sharing this for a couple of reasons. first, i wanted you to know that their evaluation of ptsd is split into two parts: traumatic events that have happened in the last year, and reactions to traumatic events over a period of time. the score is a balance between the two, so what you're seeing there is a hybrid of the two sets of answers. so if you feel you've suffered some kind of psychological damage from something in the more distant past, but haven't experienced a traumatic event more recently, expect a score somewhere in the middle.

another thing that i wanted to point out was that their questions about substance abuse disorders are very well-structured: i like a drink with dinner, or when i'm watching footie or... i like to have a drink on a pretty regular basis. but their questions don't stop at how often you indulge, but deal with your behaviour around when you indulge. hence, despite my completely honest answer about how often i drink, you'll see a big fat "0" when it comes to substance abuse disorder. it's not how often you do it, it's how it affects the rest of your life that's important. and that goes for any kind of drug.

lifeline mental health quiz

australia has some of the best online mental health resources in the world, so it's no surprise that one of their questionnaires would show up here. this is much more of an evaluation on your lifestyle and general mood. it can help you get perspective on where your areas of stress may be and help identify areas where you might need help. also provides good resources for those in need, assuming that you're in australia.

mental health america screening tools

useful because they have separate quizzes for different disorders. their "psychosis" module is a lot more useful than most online resources, because they've actually taken the time to come up with questions on a range of symptoms, rather than just corralling everyone into "schizophrenic" and "not schizophrenic" camps. they also have a specific work-related mental health survey, which is an increasing problem, although few want to admit it. [warning: this site had irritatingly long loading times for me, although everything did, eventually load. not something you're likely to be able to do quickly.]

psychcentral quiz-o-rama

every goddamned quiz, on a scale of dsm-v criteria to dr. phil. contains a very wide variety of tests on a very wide variety of disorders. most quizzes have long and short options, which is nice if you're trying to figure out all the many things that are wrong with you, then getting in-depth on a few key areas. certainly a few steps farther away from a proper diagnosis than the previous suggestions, but covers a lot of ground. strangely, nothing on type 2 mental disorders.

mental health awareness

while we're on the subject, why not take a quiz to figure out just how much you really know about mental disorders? this isn't comprehensive, by any means, but it's not a bad way to evaluate your knowledge.

have fun with those for a while and feel free to share any useful [or just fun] mental health quizzes you've encountered.


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