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and sometimes i do filmy stuff

there's no question that dom is the videoking in our household. you can check out the many things he's done, with many different artists here on his vimeo page. [he actually has two new videos premiering this week, because he works harder than i.] words are always going to be my principal form of expression, as if you couldn't tell, but i do occasionally do more visual work, if for no other reason than i get inspired by those closest to me to push my own boundaries.

i've done both found footage pieces and things assembled from bits i've shot live. this isn't a frequent thing for me, but i do sometimes get inspired. the projects are always accessible from the "film & photography" tab above, but i thought i'd repost my itty bitty œuvre here for you:

a sense of longing [oblvious] :: i got the idea of doing this while i was out for a walk trying to clear my head and come up with some writing ideas. i started following a few random people and filming them and was kind of amazed at how close i could get without getting noticed. i fully expected this day to end with me getting my face pummeled into the pavement by someone who didn't appreciate my attempts at artistic expression, but i guess luck was on my side that day. i finished up the shots over the next day or two.

holding the phone upright helped disguise what i was doing, but i also like the "boxed in" look that it gives, even though it's not something you're supposed to do.

and yes, that is me singing at the end. you've been warned.


a sense of longing [oblivious] from Kate MacDonald on Vimeo.

coming storm :: my "political" video. when i was young my parents were fans of older [even for their generation] folk music, so i got to hear a lot of songs by pete seeger and the like. it gave me an appreciation for that raw, down-to-earth, and undeniably american sound, particularly as it was used for protest songs among the rural and working-class left wing of the time.

i got inspired to do this after seeing footage of the 2013 tornado that ripped through oklahoma. a friend suggested that dom should use it for a video, but dom seemed less interested, since he was working on other things. i tried for some time to persuade him, before deciding that i'd do my own damn tornado video. except that i didn't end up using the footage from the oklahoma twister, because it looked too modern juxtaposed with the older film, and the tornado parts aren't even a prominent feature in the final film. oh well.


coming storm from Kate MacDonald on Vimeo.

guilty. guilty. guilty. :: the only film in which i've used actual people who exist in my life [other than myself]. i wanted to film people i knew while they talked about guilt and their experience of it. the filming of it was a fascinating experience, because it is a subject that makes people uncomfortable. i think you can get a sense of that in the body language. nonetheless, i feel like this is the most flawed thing that i've done. the sound on one of the video sessions was inordinately low, because it turns out that a lot of people don't want to shout the things that make them feel guilty to the world.

someday, i'd like to do a sequel to this one, but for now, it is what it is.


guilty. guilty. guilty. from Kate MacDonald on Vimeo.

they were dancers in their dreams :: i was playing around on the found footage amusement park that is archive.org, trying to find a very specific video. it's an obscure trailer for a film that doesn't exist, and i'd used bits of it for a video that i made and then lost before i could publish it, because god hates me. i didn't find that video, or anything like it, but while i was on the site, i got distracted, which is often what happens when i'm looking for things. if i could think straight, i wouldn't be nearly as creative.

i've always been fascinated by the world of dreams, which is where the "backbone" of this film comes from. dreams can be very frightening [i get night terrors, so i get that more than a lot of people], but they can also be very gentle and soothing. the thing that unites them, for me, is this sense that they're all quite fragile, that the world they exist in could shatter at any time, so this was my attempt to recreate that.

trying to recreate the atmosphere of a dream is like trying to explain to someone what an orgasm feels like. it's not possible and you're just doomed to failure. nonetheless, i like this. it might be my personal favourite of the few that i've done.


They Were Dancers in Their Dreams from Kate MacDonald on Vimeo.

do i have plans to do more of these short films? no. but i didn't have any plans to do these four either. what i plan to do and what i end up doing are almost always very different things. i dig these out every now and again to remind myself that there are times where i haven't felt especially creative, but somehow a fissure has opened and something creative has snuck through and manifested itself in an unexpected way. so if nothing else, i hope that they can do the same for any of you who might be stuck in a creative slump.

p.s. :: i asked as many people as i could about using their tracks for these films, but sometimes i just don't know how to find them. so thank you to everyone i didn't contact for not forcing vimeo and youtube to take these down. i use your music because i love you dearly. 

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