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we try not to talk about uncle jack at family reunions

in case you've ever wondered, i use all lowercase letters because i find the effect more aesthetically pleasing. there's an evenness to the text that looks better than the jagged chaos caused when you start including capitals.

and if you think about it, capitalization is completely arbitrary. each language has slightly different rules for what gets capitalized and what doesn't. german insists that you capitalize every single noun. dutch used to, but realised that this was a pain and a half and got rid of it. if you ever wonder why some people think german is an ugly language, it has nothing to do with how it sounds and everything to do with the fact that it looks like it's about to poke you in the eye with its many harsh capitals.

i would also have argued that capitals don't really serve any purpose. if i say something about 'venice', is there really anyone who's going to run to the dictionary because they assume it's some word they've never seen before? no, they'll more than likely realise that i'm talking about the city. and if you want to say that it would become confusing when you were dealing with proper names that also mean something different when used as a 'regular' word, allow me to remind you that we've been using 'lead' for centuries and the language has survived. [i might also point out that 'buffalo buffalo buffalo buffalo buffalo' is a grammatically correct sentence and even if you insert the capitals, there are still different meanings in the uncapitalized words.]

for all their capital letters, germans don't distinguish between saying "i eat" and "i am eating". polish doesn't even have definite and indefinite articles [the/ a]. because germans and poles are clever enough to be able to figure things out from context.

but then the poor gentleman tasked with editing the stuff i write for heathen harvest [where i do use capitals] posted this on my facebook wall this morning:


ok, maybe in this one specific instance, it might help to have access to capital letters.

or maybe, given that my family have done some pretty unsettling things, maybe i'm just happy to leave things ambiguous.

i'm still going to continue with using all lowercase letters here on more like space. but i probably won't be discussing horses. or uncle jack. let's just leave him alone. 

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