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Showing posts from October, 2015

making faces :: eclipsed by armani

astronomically, an eclipse is caused when one astronomical object or its shadow passes in front of another, temporarily block its light from reaching earth. as it happens, there's a similar phenomenon in the cosmetic world, where one company's offering temporarily seems to block all others from sight, because it is just so covetable and so thrilling that it's difficult to see what else is around. i'm assuming that's why armani named their fall collection "eclipse", because it is rather a perfect metaphor. thanks for giving me an easy intro, armani.

to be fair, armani's late summer/ fall offering is a little disjointed: the "eclipse" collection proper is made up of four of their eye tints, along with corresponding nail polishes and a highlight powder. there were also supposed to be coordinated eyeliners, but from what i can tell, those never made it to counters. this one has been out for a few months and while the products are still available…

world wide wednesday :: genocide by numbers

if you asked most people to name five genocides that have occurred in the last thousand years, they'd likely be stumped. many people likely couldn't name one aside from the holocaust. but there have been a lot of mass killings of ethnic, religious or other minorities conducted by governments and empires, on every continent in the world except antarctica. you read that correctly. every single continent has seen at least one genocide perpetrated on its soil and most have seen more than one.

the holocaust is the most widely recognised because it was so scrupulously documented by the perpetrators. most nations have gone to great lengths to prove that they were not responsible for the deaths of millions of people, but nazi germany seemed unsettlingly proud of their efficiency in this regard. the way that the holocaust was organised also made the horror of it more striking for those who discovered it. in other genocides, evidence has generally been slow to emerge, spread out over w…

mental health 'mondays' :: mental ben?

i'm normally loathe to share things about violent, stupid or hateful things being attributed to mental illness, because i know it only backs up the myth that people suffering from mental illness are violent, stupid and hateful people. but i have to admit that this article about republican presidential hopeful ben carson, who has pulled ahead of long-time leader donald trump in one recent poll.

a lot of people have struggled to reconcile the image of ben carson the neurosurgeon, the first man to successfully separate twins conjoined at the head and to perfect a drastic surgical technique for treating pediatric epilepsy, with the man running for the republican presidential nomination, who seems prone to statements that are politely termed "eccentric". because some of those statements sound like red meat for the republican base, the mainstream media has been prone to accepting them as policy statements without analysing them further. sure, he likened abortion to human sacri…

paranoia perspective

i'm working on the next paranoid theory of the week, but in the meantime, dom called this video to my attention. i think it's a good thing for all of us who tend to try just a little too hard to connect the dots.



of course, you could make the argument that trying to marginalize people who see coincidences by calling them paranoid [there is no equivalent word in the english language for a legitimate fear] and dismissing their arguments as unbelievable is in itself a sort of conspiracy to force people to conform to a consensus view of reality.

conspiracies do happen. we've investigated some of them here [and will investigate more]. coincidences also happen. so you should neither let yourself be bullied into believing things that seem suspicious nor into such fear and doubt that you become incapable of action. stay vigilant.

p.s. :: thanks to dom for finding this!

making faces :: heavy metal!

now here is something different for fall, something that doesn't read as cosy, or rustic, or smoky in the least. yves st. laurent's centrepiece for their fall collection, the "metal clash" palette, is like a throwback to the hair metal heyday: lots of glitz, shine, and sparkle. subtlety is for pussies.

ok, it's not quite that crazy, but i'm willing to bet there are a lot of women who will find this palette triggers memories of applying half a bottle of final net and drying their hair upside down.

i actually wasn't a metal chick in the eighties [i wasn't much of anything], but i do remember that power dressing and makeup drama were everywhere, so i do get that kind of vibe from the colours in this palette. although the shade that grabs your attention is likely to be the intense gold that occupies the upper left corner, in use this is a very cool-toned palette, more so than you might think. i find that in keeping with that eighties lean towards cold, ha…

ten reasons it's ok to be happy about the election, 2015 edition

close to ten years ago, i wrote a piece about why it was ok to be a little happy about the 2006 election result, the one that first saw stephen harper brought to power, albeit with a minority government. believe it or not, i stand by that post. the liberals had been in power close to fifteen years and they had become corrupt and ineffective. they needed to be knocked down a few pegs. i didn't agree with harper's policies, but i'd hoped that being in a minority, he'd be forced to temper the worst of them in order to negotiate support with others. in the end, of course, he chose to govern as if he were in a majority, constantly threatening to make every vote a confidence vote and throw the country into an endless cycle of elections. he clamped down on science, fomented fear and xenophobia, disenfranchised canadians living abroad, established rules for "security" that opened the door to a full-on police state, coldly ignored the plight of first nations, inuit a…

paranoid theory of the week :: did big business attempt a fascist coup of the united states?

with senator bernie sanders meeting with popular success in his grassroots campaign for the democratic party's nomination for president in 2016, we've been hearing a lot more about the depths to which corporate america will sink in order to maintain their control over wealth and power. of course, those with even a passing knowledge of modern history know that corporations have sunk pretty damn low in the past, in some cases using governments [and public funds] as their own army to strengthen their position. [if you're not familiar with the details, there are some in the world wide wednesdays piece on honduras that give an idea of what i'm talking about.] but what about at home? how far are corporate interests willing to go in order to maintain their privileges? not that far back, some argue that the answer appeared to be "all the way". so this week will look at the evidence surrounding the little known "business plot".

the theory ::
alarmed by actio…

meanwhile, in another part of the political forest...

there's no getting around it... the democrats just do not have the high comedy value of the republicans when it comes to television. donald trump was already crowing about how many more viewers "his" debates got [and, let's face it, they are his debates for the purpose of drawing an audience] before the democrats' evening in the spotlight had even started. that said, more people tuned in to watch than had ever tuned in to a democratic debate in the past [fifteen million viewers], which is probably higher than the number who watched the republican debates and took them seriously. and although the unintentional hilarity was low, those who did tune in were treated to something that americans [and canadians] rarely get: a group of candidates debating important issues and making the case for their approach being the best for the party to take into a general election.

i've been watching debates for a long time and i can honestly say that i have never seen a debate…

making faces :: fall for all, part 3 [a seasonal colour analysis experiment]

well this one was a doozy. in fact, without prejudicing the yet-to-be-completed fourth and final segment of this experiment, i'm going to say that this is probably the hardest of the four parts. for those of you who just dropped by and aren't sure what you've gotten yourself into, i've been doing a spin on typical autumnal looks in both makeup and clothing interpreted for the twelve sci/art colour analysis "seasons" [archetypes]. i started off easy with "autumn for autumns", then moved on to the darker [and brighter] side with "autumn for winters" and now we've moved on to "autumn for springs".

i touched last time on how, whereas the cooler summer and winter seasons can play around with using elements of each other's palettes, warmer seasons absolutely do not. i actually find that it's easier to incorporate typically autumn colours [in small amounts] into an outfit or makeup for cool-toned summers [because both palett…

mental health mondays :: rethinking schizophrenia

schizophrenia is one of those things that people tend to assume they understand, because they've heard the word so often. but the fact is that none of us know very much about schizophrenia, because even the people who've studied it the most admit that they don't know very much about it. so the rest of us are clearly fumbling around in the dark.

a couple of things that everyone should know are what schizophrenia isn't: it isn't the same as schizoaffective disorder or schizoid disorder. and when you hear the term "schizo" applied to behaviour, more often than not it's referring to a layman's interpretation of bipolar disorder, meaning behaviour that seems to be diametrically opposed to itself over a short period of time. [that's not an accurate portrayal of bipolar disorder either, but that's an issue for another day.] also, schizophrenia is often conflated with dissociative personality disorder or "multiple personality disorder" a…

paranoid theory of the week :: the reading list

this is actually an older post that i'm recycling, because it predates "paranoid theory of the week" and i think it would be of interest to those who are fans of these posts. the titles are all fiction, but some of them touch on real conspiracies and mysteries, while others just exhibit a style that will appeal to conspiracy buffs and reinforce that way of looking at the world. feel free to send along any suggestions as well.

*
screw the davinci code, or any of those other pop fiction mysteries that have enjoyed a moment in the spotlight. if you, like me, enjoy a novel that fills you with the sense of creeping dread that comes only from the sensation that vast, powerful, alien forces are controlling your life and your destiny, here are a few choice fiction bits that you must check out!

charles palliser :: the quincunx :: the fastest eight hundred pages you will ever read. this story of inheritance in all its forms, set in nineteenth century england is remarkable not just…

making faces :: image rehabilitation with nars

poor pasiphaƫ. she was a child of divinity: her father was helios, god of the sun and her mother was perse, one of the daughters of the titans oceanus and perse; her sister was circe, the enchantress who turned odysseus' men into swine; she was married to king minos of crete, himself the son of zeus and europa; she was powerful in pharmakeia, or witchcraft [also the root of a few english words, as you can probably guess], enough that when her husband proved unfaithful, she cast a spell on him that made him shoot scorpions and centipedes and wasps out his dick when he came, which is the sort of information that tends to circulate pretty quickly even in ancient crete, where weird was just what happened. but despite her illustrious lineage and enviable powers, pasiphaƫ is remember for only one thing: she fucked a bull.

pasiphaĆ« did something to annoy the gods and was cursed to lust after a bull, getting so preoccupied with him that she contracted daedalus to build her a large cow out…

world wide wednesdays :: the other african americans

during the 1960s and 70s, there was a wave of interest among young black americans in reconnecting with the african cultures from which they were descended. the civil rights era not only meant increasing freedoms to live as white americans always had and increasing participation in america's cultural life, but also a freedom to discover who they were before they were shuttled over to the united states as slaves [knowledge whites have always been able to take for granted]. interestingly, though, not all american blacks had lost touch with their culture. one group had kept close to their roots while at the same time incorporating elements of the new world and they still exist, guarding their unique culture today.

the people, called the gullah or gullah geechee, have been in the united states for hundreds of years. they were brought over as slaves from west africa, primarily sierra leone, ghana, senegal, the gambia and especially from angola. slaves from these areas were in particula…