Skip to main content

a statement of intent before i completely lose my marbles

it's september and it's still above 30c. that's not supposed to happen. this is the one time of year when i'm supposed to like the weather.

it doesn't help that we've been slowly [very slowly] redecorating the apartment and getting rid of a rather frightening amount of stuff. and by "getting rid of" i mean "pushing into the front room until such time as i feel i can wrestle it downstairs". do not allow yourself to accumulate stuff. stuff is the enemy. i live under the tyranny of stuff.

so clearly, all this is messing with my scheduling a bit, which has got me thinking.

first of all, true to my word, "mental health mondays" will be back this coming week, so once again, the fake doctor will be in.

i've noticed in recent weeks that the "world wide wednesdays" posts are showing a sharp difference in terms of views: it makes me happy that the ones that get the most are generally the longest, most detailed and demand the most of me. however, that also makes me nervous, because i know i can't maintain that on a weekly schedule. so starting now, i'll only be doing www every second week. so the next one will appear on september 9. i already know what it's going to be about...

i am thinking that i will have it alternate with another feature that's a little less time-intensive to write. 

part of the reason for doing that is so that i can continue with "paranoid theory of the week" every week. the plan is to have it up some time on the weekend, but i like being able to give myself some flexibility there, because sometimes, shit just comes up.

"making faces" and "armchair centre back" will continue to appear at irritatingly random intervals, but you can generally count on them not being on days when other posts are scheduled.

likewise, fiction and writing posts will be peppered throughout like so much buckshot into your brain. i'm targeting late september to get "a definable moment in time" back up and running. once it is, it's probably going to get a day too, but let's see how that works out.  

plus, of course, there will be other random posts like this one.

since you've made it this far in a rather dull and administrative post, i feel like i should wind up with something good. here are pictures of cats. our cats. all of them.












and if that's not enough, there's going to be an extra special, totally awesome utterly exclusive debut of the new synapscape video on monday at heathen harvest. their first album in four years will be out mid-month on ant-zen, so this will whet your appetite for what's to come. dom is the mind behind the video, which is just one more reason for me to be proud of him.


finally, here are sloths enjoying leaves more than you've probably enjoyed anything in years.


thank you, as always, for reading. we'll be getting into the new seasonal swing of things very shortly, as long as my brains don't get all spongy and green from the humidity.

Comments

as long as you're here, why not read more?

sh*t no one tells you about being a caregiver

i've been a full-time caregiver for close to six years. that makes it sound like it's a full-time job, which it is and also like it's full-time employment, which it isn't. the difference i'm making between those is how the work is valued by society as a whole: a job is something that needs to be done; a job becomes employment when it's important enough that we're willing to pay someone to do it. as much as canadians take pride in the medical care we provide citizens and permanent residents, our positive results are often built on an institutionalized fudging of numbers that hides who's really doing the work.

when it comes to caring for those with ongoing medical needs, the vast majority of care [roughly 75%] is provided by unpaid workers. 8.1 million people in a country of 37.59 million offer unpaid caregiving services at some point. some of those unpaid caregivers are lucky, in that they can afford the time it takes to look after someone else without …

white trash

yes, my lovelies, i have returned from the dead, at least for the time it takes me to write this post. this is not just another piece of observational drivel about how i haven't been taking care of the blog lately, although i clearly haven't. on that front, though, the principal cause of my absence has actually been due to me trying to get another, somewhat related project, off the ground. unfortunately, that project has met with some frustrating delays which means that anyone who follows this blog [perhaps there are still a few of you who haven't entirely given up] would understandably be left with the impression that i'd simply forsaken more like space to marvel at the complexity of my own belly button lint. [it's possible you had that impression even before i disappeared.]

ok, enough with that. i have a subject i wanted to discuss with you, in the sense that i will want and encourage you to respond with questions, concerns and criticism in the comments or by em…

world wide wednesdays :: euskadi

this is a new thing i'm trying on the blog, based on a fascination i have with various underrepresented, marginalised or misunderstood cultures around the world. i tend to spend a lot of my late night bouts of "i have insomnia and i need something to think about so that i don't shoot myself and anyone who tries to stop me" reading up on these subjects. since this blog has always been a repository for the stuff that clogs up my brain [as well as a place where i can curse at things and channel the discussions with the voices in my head], i figured i might as well share some of what i've learned.

i'm not even going to pretend that these are exhaustive, journalistic or academic in any way. i just think that there's a lot of interesting shit in the world ["interesting shit in the world" being my alternate choice for "world wide wednesdays"] and the more people who post about it, the more people will be spurred to investigate.

so, as a first…