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making faces :: journey to the heart of light

i'll never understand why some brands launch things so quietly. yves st. laurent snuck in a whole new range of blushes without so much as a ripple, it seems, and that is such a disservice. for starters, it seems that these new blushes, dubbed both "blush volupté" and "heart of light" are replacing their existing powder blushes, which is something i would like to have known before they started disappearing on me. i also would have liked a little more fanfare surrounding the introduction of these new shades in a new formula.

now, i've always liked ysl powder blushes. they've never been the highest profile items in their collection, but yves has a lot of hidden gems and the new "heart of light" blushes look to fall into the same category. trusting my instincts, when i saw that they were available [which is a while ago now], i immediately ordered one to try out. there are a number of cooler pinks that grabbed my attention, however, i decided to go a little out of my comfort zone and order something that looked more like an orange-coral, shade #6, "passionée".


as it turns out "passionée" is a more natural shade than it appears on the sephora web site, with less apricot and more warm pink tones. it's much less warm than i expected, while still being generally warm overall. like all the "heart of light" blushes, it has an outer "ring" in a deeper shade with an inner "heart" [actually a square, which isn't a good shape for a heart at all] at the centre. like the new eye shadow palettes that debuted this year, the pattern debossed on the powder is inspired by yves st/ laurent's iconic "mondrian dress". the blushes are the same size as the shadow palettes, which is convenient for storage, but means that it can be difficult to pick the two shades up separately. it's certainly easiest to swirl a brush around and pick up both colours, however it's also relatively easy to stick to the sides and pick up only the deeper colour. if you want the central colour only, you'll have to use a smaller brush and execute some patience. that said, the most interesting and beautiful results come from the combination of the two shades.

l to r :: outer shade, inner shade, blended




the outer shade is an almost matte coral with a lot of pink to it. the inner shade is a shimmery light peach. combined, they make something that is rich in colour, but has a healthy sheen, which means that it serves as a blush and highlighter in one. something that everyone should know before diving in is that these blushes swatch terribly. no matter what you use, the colour payoff looks piss-poor and will give you a horrible impression. applied, there's pretty intense colour [use caution]. in that way, they reminded me of the texture of guerlain's "rose aux joues" blushes. which were great in use but similarly difficult to swatch.


because it is overall a more pink-coral, there are a lot of shades that come close to "passionée", which was my one slight disappointment when i tried it. hourglass "luminous flush" is brighter and more shimmery. nars "deep throat" is softer, cooler and more subtle. that said, despite having some close cousins, i've been reaching for this shade an almost indecent amount, because i love the balance of colour and finish, which is as good as any i've seen.

l to r :: hourglass luminous flush, passionée blended, nars deep throat

the "heart of light" blush is available in nine shades. i've now had the opportunity to look at them all in person and there is a good range from warm to cool. there are more light than dark shades [the line lacks an intense brick or plum shade], but the colour payoff you can achieve is pretty intense with what's available. the formula is silky and will disguise pores and unevenness, obviating the need for a finishing powder. the product lasts extremely well on me and doesn't tend to fade much.

here's a look at the blush in action. what you're seeing here is a fairly light application, which should give you an idea of the intensity the blush is capable of achieving. it doesn't become especially powdery when built up, either, but buffs nicely into the skin while offering plenty of pigment.




products used

base ::
hourglass mineral veil primer
urban decay naked skin "1.0
dior star concealer "010"
mac paint pot "painterly"
mac prep & prime finishing powder

eyes ::
nars e/s duo "tropical princess" [icy lilac and acid green chartreuse]
le metier de beauté e/s "corinthian" [shimmery pink taupe]
urban decay 24/7 e/l "smoke" [cool charcoal grey]
guerlain cils d'enfer mascara

cheeks ::
yves st. laurent blush volupté "passionée" [warm coral pink]

lips ::
bite beauty deconstructed rose l/s "crimson"*

*suggested alternates :: crimson =  rouge d'armani 402

do i recommend the new "heart of light" blushes? absolutely. unreservedly. highly. i'll miss the older shades, but these new ones have won me over. over time, i expect that the range of shades will expand a little, which will fill out the one area which seems wanting with this new collection. don't believe the lack of hype: these are stunning. 

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