Skip to main content

mental health mondays :: a nut house divided

although the history of schizophrenia is not particularly long, it has already become exceedingly complex. in the late 1800s, german physician emil kraepelin invented the term "dementia praecox" to refer to cases of mental illness that occurred in younger people- those too young to be suffering from age-related dementia. in 1911, the term "schizophrenia" was coined by swiss psychiatrist eugen bleuler, in order to distinguish the disorder from proper dementia, which involved a deterioration of mental faculties. his work was crucial in determining the characteristics of what we now call schizophrenia, including the identification of both positive symptoms [things that schizophrenics do that the rest of us don't] and negative symptoms [things schizophrenics don't do that the rest of us do].

unfortunately, while various drugs to control schizophrenia have been developed and many, many studies done, the progress on understanding the disorder has been remarkably slow. various subtypes were added underneath the larger umbrella of schizophrenia, but with the publication of the dsm-v, field professionals decided that those had become cumbersome without being especially useful. so all of the subtypes were removed in 2013 and schizophrenia became just one very large restaurant with a large variety of crazy treats on the menu.

more recently, however, the results of a study of thousands of schizophrenia patients may have proved that schizophrenia, as we've conceived of it thus far, may not even exist. rather, what we call schizophrenia is actually a series of eight separate disorders which can be identified genetically and, to a great extent, predicted based on the presence or absence of certain other genes.

the fact that schizophrenia has hung around this long as a diagnostic term may be related to our own unwillingness to deal with mental illness. we don't assume that every symptom related to the lungs is lung cancer, because we know that the lungs can be affected by many different things. but there was a tendency among doctors to simply lump psychiatric symptoms together as equalling "schizophrenia". this new study indicates that different psychiatric symptoms- like hallucinations or disordered speech- are indicative of different disorders and that they are caused by different combinations of genes. so rather than being a disease on its own, schizophrenia is better understood as being a category, like "autoimmune disorder" or "heart disease".

the good news, of course, is that a better understanding should allow for the development of better treatments. medicine can move beyond using one type of approach for what is actually a lot of different diseases and instead focus on what will actually reduce the impact of the disorder on people's lives.

the bad news is that the study raises the possibility that genetics is a lot more important than we might have believed in the development of mental illness. that doesn't mean simply that schizophrenic disorders will run in families [although it may well], but that your own propensity to such a disorder is determined largely by which specific gene clusters you have. indeed, the study indicates that by looking at specific gene clusters, doctors can predict with a high degree of accuracy who will develop a schizophrenic condition at some point. and if you have those gene clusters, there is basically a little time bomb in your head that will someday explode and fuck everything up. [although hopefully not until after some new treatments exist.]

doctors have been arguing for years that schizophrenia has become a catch all term, encompassing too much to be meaningful. and indeed, this study seems to lend scientific credence to that; schizophrenia has developed multiple personalities.

Comments

L.P. said…
This is pretty big news. I got my MSW degree in 1989 (clinical mental health) and we spent a lot of time on schizophrenia- symptoms, diagnosis, treatment. I also worked quite a bit with people diagnosed as chronically mentally ill, and most of them had multiple diagnoses by different doctors. For a few years they'd be treated for a particular type of bipolar disorder, then when no progress was made it would they'd try, say, schizoaffective disorder. Schizophrenia often seemed to be the diagnosis when they had no place else to go. (I haven't worked in the field in years, just to be clear.)
Kate MacDonald said…
Thanks for the insight, LP! Most of the people I know who have been diagnosed have had multiple diagnoses from multiple doctors, so that they're never quite sure who they should believe. I'm curious to hear more about this.

as long as you're here, why not read more?

wrong turn

as some of you are aware, i have a long-term project building a family tree. this has led me to some really interesting discoveries, like the fact that i am partly descended from crazy cat people, including the patron saint of crazy cat ladies, that a progenitor of mine once defeated a french naval assault with an army of scarecrows, that my well-established scottish roots are just as much norwegian as scottish, and that a relative of mine from the early middle ages let one rip with such ferocity that that's basically all he's remembered for. but this week, while i was in the midst of adding some newly obtained information, i found that some of my previous research had gone in an unexpected direction: the wrong one.

where possible, i try to track down stories of my better-known relatives and in doing so this week, i realised that i couldn't connect one of my greatˣ grandfathers to his son through any outside sources. what's worse that i found numerous sources that con…

dj kali & mr. dna @ casa del popolo post-punk night

last night was a blast! a big thank you to dj tyg for letting us guest star on her monthly night, because we had a great time. my set was a little more reminiscent of the sets that i used to do at katacombes [i.e., less prone to strange meanderings than what you normally hear at the caustic lounge]. i actually invited someone to the night with the promise "don't worry, it'll be normal". which also gives you an idea of what to expect at the caustic lounge. behold my marketing genius.

mr. dna started off putting the "punk" into the night [which i think technically means i was responsible for the post, which doesn't sound quite so exciting]. i'd say that he definitely had the edge in the bouncy energy department.

many thanks to those who stopped in throughout the night to share in the tunes, the booze and the remarkably tasty nachos and a special thank you to the ska boss who stuck it out until the end of the night and gave our weary bones a ride home…

eat the cup 2018, part seven :: oh, lionheart

it all seemed so magical: england's fresh-faced youngsters marching all the way through to a semi-final for the first time since 1990. everywhere, the delirious chants of "it's coming home". and then, deep into added time, the sad realization: it's not coming home. oh england, my lionheart.

now, if we're being really strict about things, my scottish ancestors would probably disown me for supporting England, because those are the bastards who drove them off their land and sent them packing to this country that's too hot in the summer and too cold in the winter. and indeed, shops in scotland have sold through their entire stock of croatian jerseys, as the natives rallied behind england's opponents in the semi-final. however, a few generations before they were starved and hounded from the lands they'd occupied for centuries, my particular brand of scottish ancestors would have encouraged me to support england [assuming that national football had even…