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what's the racket?

it's been a [very long] while since i posted anything to do with music on here. many moons ago, i used to occasionally do reviews and write about shows and other things. a little more recently, i've posted some playlists, something i keep meaning to do again, but it's on a long list of things i'm planning on doing again.

while music has always been a driving force in my life, i've become less and less adept at speaking about it. years ago, i probably spent at least fifty percent of my conversational time talking about it. it wasn't so much that music was my life [although it had an inordinately large influence], but talking about music was my life. i worked in radio. i talked about music on air. my friends were mostly other radio people, or they were in bands, or both. so we talked about music. i consumed catalogues from overseas music labels like teenaged boys consume porn.

i still have lots of thoughts about music and still have conversations with friends about it in quite some depth. but i'm no longer hip to what the kids are listening to these days [i have to make a concerted effort to find new things to tickle my ear-holes] and i've always believed that to speak meaningfully on a regular basis about any form of modern music, you need to be pretty conversant in both the present and past of your subject.

quite honestly, being even conversant in any genre of music in the age of internet proliferation seems like a full time job. but maybe it always was, it's just that it's no longer my full-time job. there's no arguing, though, that it is just possible to access way more music than at any point in history. i'm still uncertain as to whether the net result of that is a good or bad thing.

hm. in my effort to not writing about music, i seem to have written a nice blurb about not writing about music. i'm sure that proves something, although i'm not sure what.

here are a few things that i've been enjoying/ getting to know recently.



no, not the german army. this is a rather obscure, hard to define outfit who liken themselves to cabaret voltaire, nocturnal emissions, dark day and even zoviet france. i can kind of see what they mean, but they seem to have their own interesting thing going on. like a lot of newer bands, they've released a metric arseload of material in a surprisingly short period of time.



i must have had alberich recommended to me a half dozen times either by humans or by clever bots [see my previous post] thinking they'd guessed my musical taste. when i noticed that he's playing here in montreal shortly, i figured it was worth finding out if these people/ bots were right. turns out, they were. something about his sound reminds me of dive, but different eras of dive kind of smooshed together. there's also clearly comparisons to spk that could be made. i do like the fact that he often incorporates very melodic, pretty elements alongside the overdriven rhythms.



it may feel like you've heard everything that there is to thump, but this ladies do cook a mean groove. excellent walking music when you're in a hurry, or just feel like pushing people.



not new, but something i've been rediscovering, thanks to a conversation about the trilogy with a facebook friend recently. perfect music to listen to alone in the dark. these were always winter albums for me, but i can be flexible...

that's all for now. the image at the top of the post is from a buzzfeed quiz that, as you can see, is terrifyingly accurate [except that i never did get into belle and sebastian]. you can take it for yourself here.

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