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making faces :: tripling down

part of me wishes that i'd just been all piggy and grabbed all the hourglass ambient lighting blushes the day they came out, however i take great pains to ensure that that part of me is never allowed near the credit cards.

as a result, i'm reviewing these as i get them, at a measured pace, although i have to say that every new one that i bring home is just making me eager for more. most recently [which i have to admit wasn't all that recently now], i brought home "diffused heat", which is a supposed to be a combination of a warm poppy red with the "diffused light" ambient lighting powder.

some of you might recall that "diffused light" was my favourite of the ambient lighting powders. there is something about it's sainty white, warmed by just a hint of cheery yellow that makes my heart flutter and, more to the point, makes my complexion nearly perfect. it was a deliberate choice on my part to hold off on "diffused heat", because i didn't see any way that it could live up to the glory of its predecessor.

and it doesn't completely, but that isn't to say that i don't love it, more just an indication of how glorious the original is.

HOW NICE IS IT? CONTINUE READING...



this is the first time that i've received one of the blushes that has a clear predominance of ambient lighting powder in its mix. each unit will be different- such is the nature of the beast- but thus far mine have leaned toward the blush-heavy side. despite this, i still had no problem getting a great deal of pigment from the blush, so i think that the overall colour will likely end up more or less the same, no matter what your individual pan looks like.

MY diffused heat
the colour in this case is a medium-bright peachy pink with a shimmery texture. that surprised me a little, because among the ambient lighting powders "diffused heat" is one of the least shimmery. only "ethereal light" is more matte. nonetheless, i wouldn't say that the shimmer is tremendously obvious on the face, where it smoothes into more of an overall glow. on my face, it pulls a little pinker when applied, but if your undertones are yellower than mine, i would expect that it would look more peach.

diffused heat
these blushes go on pretty light, but build remarkably well and blend well. that means that if you have too little, you can easily add more and if you accidentally apply too much, you won't have trouble toning it down. i find that it looks very natural even when applied fairly heavily, which i'll illustrate shortly.

my first thought in terms of comparisons was that it didn't seem all that different than "luminous flush", but seen side by side, it's clearly lighter and warmer. on my cheeks, "luminous flush" looks noticeably deeper, even when applied lightly. one thing that i would note is that the deeper and warmer your complexion, the less i think that you'll see a difference between these two.

l to r :: diffused heat, hourglass luminous flush
i continue to be impressed with the formula of these blushes. they kick up a bit more powder than i'd like [and i'd say that "diffused heat" is worse on that score than either of the other two that i've tried], which translates to waste, but there's still a generous amount per pan and, what's really important, it gives the same kind of luminous finish as the ambient lighting powders.

most exciting, hourglass will be launching a three-pan palette of blushes, as they have done for the ambient lighting powders [speaking of things i need to review here...], featuring two existing and one unique shade. from the existing line, "luminous flush" and "mood exposure" will be featured, plus a blush based on the "incandescent light" ambient lighting powder [available only in the palette]. i know i'm going to be bringing that home as soon as it rears its head.

now here's a quick look i put together featuring "diffused heat". to give a comparison, i applied it lightly on my left cheek [your right] and built it up a little more on the right cheek [your left]. both look natural, but i think that it gives a clear idea in the difference you can get. [well, you could actually build it up more than what i have here, but i only have two cheeks to work with. or that i'm willing to work with.]




products used

the base ::
yves st. laurent teint touche ├ęclat foundation "b10"
nars radiant creamy concealer "vanilla"
mac paint pot "painterly"
mac prep and prime finishing powder [side note: i have no idea what they did to this powder between now and the last time i bought it, but it now smells terrible. vaguely latex-like. gross.]

the eyes ::
nars e/s duo "grand palais" [pink taupe, warm rose]
illamasqua precision gel liner
ysl effet faux cils mascara "noir radical"

the cheeks ::
hourglass ambient lighting blush "diffused heat" [pink apricot]

the lips ::
nars satin lip pencil "golshan" [deep brick red]

the bottom line here? thus far, i think that you'd be satisfied with any choice from the hourglass blush selection. this one may differ substantially from the ambient lighting powder on which it's based, but it's still an exquisite blush.

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dreamspeak

ok, so i've been lax about posting here. i apologise. there are reasons. i don't know if they'ree good reasons, but they include:


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