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dj kali and mr. dna bring you... the dancing dead

it had been a while since mr. dna and i had gotten to do a more "club-style" night. because i was nervous, i did something i almost never do: i made a playlist. the upshot of this for me was that i spent a a lot of time in the surprisingly roomy dj booth worrying that i couldn't think of what to be worried about. i'm like that. 

mr. dna, who does normally make well-ordered playlists for himself went more freeform with his approach, bringing lots of stuff and using a few specific tracks to inspire his flow, which is what i usually do. 

so essentially, we reversed dj identities last night. [strange note: the other dj'ing couple we know also have one member who carefully prepares playlists and another who prefers to keep things more open, connecting the dots between a few chosen tracks. is this a thing?]

here's what you heard, or here's what you missed, depending on where you were:



dj kali
kapo :: only europa knows
hula :: at the heart
danielle dax :: bed caves
killing joke :: unspeakable
wire :: should've known better
joy division :: shadowplay
pop 1280 :: bodies in the dunes
chrome :: anorexic sacrifice

mr. dna
david bowie :: boys keep swinging
disappointed a few people :: dead in love
my dog popper :: i lost my job to a guy named gino
flipper :: ha ha ha
the adicts :: easy way out
gang of four :: not great men
swell maps :: let's build a car
the fall :: rowche rumble
iggy & the stooges :: raw power
bikini kill :: rebel girl

dj kali
die form :: analogic
portion control :: chew ya to bits
skinny puppy :: assimilate
the human league :: empire state human
fad gadget :: ricky's hand
john foxx :: underpass
factory floor :: lying
ultravox :: the thin wall
test department :: compulsion
generentola :: la gata
cosmetics :: black leather gloves
crystal castles :: empathy
clock dva :: the hacker

mr. dna
public image ltd. :: the order of death
add n to (x) :: metal fingers in my body
lfo :: freak
crash course in science :: it cost's to be austere
synapscape :: who painted my cat black?
frank alpine :: no exit
ministry :: over the shoulder 12"
front 242 :: masterhit (parts 1&2)
meat beat manifesto :: dogstar man/ helter skelter

dj kali 
the cure :: one hundred years
neon judgment :: chinese black
tuxedomoon :: no tears
six finger satellite :: baby's got the rabies
devo :: signal ready
the gun club :: sex beat
holger hiller :: jonny
my life with the thrill kill kult :: days of swine and roses
shriekback :: nemesis
dead kennedys :: moon over marin
siouxsie and the banshees :: hong kong garden
perverse teens :: la baboute
coil :: heartworms

Comments

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