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making faces :: you got autumn in my spring!

we're still stuck in weather that's more reminiscent of late october than late april here, with a lot of grey days, cool winds and temperatures that struggle to reach that double-digit threshold. perhaps that's why i was so drawn to one of yves st. laurent's new glossy stains, introduced with their spring collection, which has a decidedly autumnal bent. it's also possible that i just love the opportunity to buy a mice burgundy lip product at any time of year and am happy that yves gave me the excuse to insist that's it's really in keeping with spring.

in the fashion world, a number of writers have noted that colours more traditionally associated with fall collections found a place on runways for spring 2014, so it shouldn't be surprising that there is some of that reflected in cosmetics. specifically, it's reflected in the new glossy stain called "bourgogne artistique", also known as #33. it's a deep, ruby red that looks a little deeper on the lips than on the skin, as you can see. like other glossy stains, the formula has an ever-so-slight translucency, so while there's plenty of colour, it's like looking at stained glass [or a glass of burgundy wine? -ed.], in that it's not opaque.

strangely, though, as vampy as the colour might look at first blush, there is something that honestly makes me think of this as more of a "springtime vamp". it's dark, but it's also bright, both swatched and [a little less evidently] on the lips. it lacks the earthier, browner tones of the more autumnal shades. the glassy finish also reinforces this, since reflected light is something that's associated with the warmer [in theory], sunnier [again, in theory] seasons.

bourgogne artistique
the unique glossy stain formula alone makes this shade tricky to match and, when i looked in my extensive collection, i couldn't really find something that similar. the closest was chanel "crushed cherry" gloss, which looks a lot closer swatched than it does on the lips. "crushed cherry" is cooler and, on first application, looks a little darker than "bourgogne artistique". applied, though, the former is more of a true gloss and fades fairly quickly, while the latter hangs on for hours.

i also swatched rouge d'armani #408 ["rosewood red"], which is a fall shade that is a little short of opaque, but you can see that it's browner and more muted, which goes to my point about "bourgogne artistique" being spring-like in defiance of its dark appearance.

l to r :: chanel crushed cherry, bourgogne artistique, rouge d'armani 408

some people may not feel comfortable with something so deep in the spring and to them i say: buy it anyway and save it for fall. or wear it as a light stain [very easier with this formula] so that it's not so intimidating. it is absolutely worth the investment.

here's a look at "bourgogne artistique" in action. i would happily tell you what else i'm wearing, but i can't remember it for the life of me. perhaps the type of colour will inspire you? no? i'm a failure...





at the same time, i picked up my very first yves st. laurent nail polish, also part of the spring collection, a cool, bright pink called "rose scabiosa". i've included a couple of photos for you, but they're not the best. more just to give you an idea of the colour, which reminded me of notoriously "difficult" pinks like mac "st. germain" that are very cool in tone and have a lot of white in their base. "rose scabiosa" is less jarring than the brightest of those, since the white in the base is a little softer, and, well, it's a nail polish, which means that it's not sitting right there in the middle of your face distracting everyone.



i very much liked the colour, which is good because the formula was a little tricky for me to work with. you can see in the photos that there is some bubbling on the nail. this happened the first time that i applied it. the second time, i was more patient and extremely careful to let my coats dry completely before applying the next one. both times i wore it, the application on the first coat was streaky, but when i made sure that the first was absolutely dry before proceeding, i did find that the second coat levelled out nicely. working too quickly meant that i had to use a third coat, since the stickiness seemed to cause the streaks to settle into one another. needless to say, i was much happier with the second time i wore this. i just forgot to take photos...

the entire yves st. laurent spring collection is decidedly a departure from pastels, moving into what seems like a modern take on a sultan's palace, a north african spice market or the like. there are purples and golds and different shades of red and the fiery edge of coral. it's not quite chanel's tropical spring look, but there are some common elements. i'm allergic to them, but the shades of rouge volupte lipstick with the collection are lovely. the two products i picked up are outstanding. while i felt that the more hyped items- the eye shadow palette and the blush- were a little disappointing, there are some real gems that warrant a purchase.

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