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making faces :: fall in, part 1 :: make like a tree

since i did an in-depth look earlier at shades that typified spring, i thought it was high time that i looked at my very favourite season, autumn. to that end, i figured i'd do a series of posts of shades that are perfect for autumn looks of various types. unlike for spring, that involves splitting some of them up in different ways, since there's some different ways of looking at fall... but i'll get into that later. it's also an opportunity for me to plough through several reviews that i've been meaning to do in the name of the season...

let's start off with the eyes, though, shall we? let's start off with the fact that shades we use on the eyes can so delightfully mirror those that we see in the foliage around us at this time of year. the rich reds, the deep greens, the burnt golds... it's a colour-lovers paradise and, thanks to companies who have expanded the range of shades available, a cosmetic-lovers' paradise. here are a few of my favourites from the season.

nars :: blade runner

if you want to do any kind of fall-foliage inspired look, you need this eye shadow duo. nothing, i repeat nothing, is as perfect an accompaniment. it has the deep, rich green of the last leaves of fall- not a light spring green and not a blackened green, but the rich shade that's the last we see on maple trees before they succumb to the call of fall. paired with that is a mahogany red-brown that's a perfect combination of depth and residual warmth. both shades are intensely beautiful and, for a fall look, beautiful together, although you might want to add another colour for a highlight...

nars blade runner
mac :: one to watch

is it just me or do some of mac's very best releases fly below the radar? a couple of years back, they released their first round of prolongwear eye shadows and they were excellent. i'll admit that i don't need longer wear from their shadows- i get plenty- but those shades were excellent and, in a few cases, quite original. take this one, which is a perfect orange-brown-gold, just like the shade of the leaves outside my window right now. it's warm and rich without being ostentatious. i love how it can be combined with either neutral looks or as the anchor in something more daring. deserving of far more attention than it's gotten.

mac one to watch
ellis faas :: e303

i've reviewed this one before, but it wouldn't be fall if i couldn't turn to my holy grail of golden bronze. this is the bomb when it comes to intense, rich, metallic eye shades. nothing can compare to its molten beauty.

ellis faas e303
le metier de beaute :: fire lily

although the shade isn't quite as smooth as what i've come to expect from le metier, it is indeed a beauty. halfway between copper and pink, it doesn't cheat to either side and as a result, it's appropriate for either warm or cool-toned looks. it will look great with plums or with golds and greens. the choices are perhaps not endless, but very broad. it has enough warmth that it won't look pink against your eyes, but enough coolness that it won't look oppressively warm. it is, perhaps, the perfect coppery tone for fall, able to give a hint of colour when applied lightly, or able to assume the starring role.

le metier de beaute fire lily
what? no browns? well, i thought about it and i realised that there are just so many browns available that it was difficult to limit my selection. a few personal favourites of mine are:

for a liner... stila lionfish, a rich, warm brown with golden shimmer
for adding depth... nars mekong, a dark, bitter chocolate brown with gold shimmer [again!]
for adding warmth... mac sable or twinks, both plummy browns, both gorgeous

in the interests of keeping things simple, i've only included shades that are part of permanent collections, but who knows how long that'll last...

Comments

Carina said…
Ah, beautiful picks, Kate! :) I am in love with Fire Lily.

as long as you're here, why not read more?

so what the hell happened here?

even i'm shocked at the fact that i haven't written a blog post in a month and a half. and i'm confused by it, which many of you may not be because, hey, blogs are dead, right? well, i don't know if they're dead dead. this place gets a surprising number of daily views considering that there have been no new posts since early february. and if you're one of the regular readers who might have been checking in to see which of my regular subjects i'd be tackling next, i'm going to have to disappoint you: this post is just going to be some meaningless blather.

first of all, i didn't intend to step back from the blog- not for a month and a half, not at all. i figured i'd just keep motoring on much as i had been for the last dozen or so years, if for no other reason than it had become as natural to me as breathing or reading stuff on the internet that made me angry.

so why haven't i written anything here?

it's not because i've lacked subjec…

making faces :: three springs

this post comes with a bit of a preamble:

it's hardly surprising that i would eventually become fascinated by the sci-art theory of personal colour,
given that it's linked both with aesthetics and with psychology. i'm actually a little surprised that it took me this long, but i have been making up for lost time by reading through a lot of the posts on the fascinating 12 blueprints blog, after having gotten a taste for the subject from reading everyday beauty's adventures in being drapes.

for those not familiar with the concept, i do not claim to be an expert, but it basically stems from theories of how we perceive colours. for someone who has long been schooled in the concepts that there are certain colours that everyone perceives as "strong" or "relaxing" or "energetic", etc., it's a bit of a process of unlearning. or at least, learning that what you might have accepted as gospel before was somewhat limited.

it's certainly been il…

i'm definitely someone altogether different

about a hundred years ago, i remember having a partner who told me that, rather than writing the sort of ambiance-oriented crap [he didn't say crap, i'm saying it] that i was naturally driven to write, i should just compose something like the harry potter books. this wasn't out of any sense of challenging me to do new things but because of the desperate hope that my love of writing could be parlayed into something profitable.

my reaction at the time was "i just can't". and that was honestly how i felt because i didn't believe that that kind of story was in me. for the record, i still don't think that anything like the potter-hogwarts universe is in me. i'm not a fan of fantasy literature generally speaking and i feel like there's a richer experience to be examined in looking at our experience as regular humans being part of the rational, limited, everyday world and at the same time being able to feel connected to something that, for lack of a…