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making faces :: a sliver of silver from nars

i've been so busy trying to keep up with all of the new products that nars has been launching this year, that i've almost forgotten to check in on the actual colour collections they've been launching. shame on me, because some of the shades have been really fun- a slew of bright, energetic shades in shocking combinations that somehow still work. but what's a girl to do when there's been new concealers and finishing powders and a new lipstick formula and super-sizes blushes and pairs of nail polish... whew!

frighteningly enough for my wallet, it appears that there's more to come- a new foundation and a new gel eye liner/ shadow formula and much more. but i did take a moment to catch my breath and grab a single eye shadow from the nars summer collection. ironically, i'm reviewing this as their fall collection is about to hit stores, so i'm clearly a little behind the times, but the good news is that it's been added to the permanent line-up, so we'll be able to get it for the foreseeable future.

so let's have a look at it, shall we?



"euphrate" is an interesting take on a silver shadow. i normally think of all silvers as being the same, but i'm gradually realising that there are important, subtle differences. "euphrate" is medium-to-light, not light enough to work as a highlighter on me, although i believe it could on very dark skin. the reason is that, unlike a lot of silver shadows, "euphrate" is shimmery without giving a really frosted look. it can be applied quite lightly for a hint of colour, but even when built up, it never seems heavy. greys can have a tendency to drain the colour from my face, but this one doesn't, perhaps because there is a definite blue-green undertone to it.

COMPARISONS AND ACTION SHOTS AFTER THE BREAK...



you can see the undertone clearly when you compare it to a more neutral silver like mac "melt my heart" [a limited shade, but similar to the permanent shade "electra"]. i also find that you can see a natural flow from a greenish-silver shade like "euphrate" to something like rouge bunny rouge "periwinkle cardinal", a sage green with a silver shimmer.

l to r :: mac melt my heart [l.e.], euphrate, rbr periwinkle cardinal
because the undertone is more of a hint than anything else, it can be shaped by what shades you put around it. here's a look i did combining it with colours from a couple of other nars duos, that pull the bluer tones and make it look somewhat cooler. [i have no idea what's going on with my face in that second photo, but it made me laugh, so i figured i might as well use it.]





products used

the base ::
marcelle beauty balm "light/ medium"
nars radiant tinted moisturizer "terre neuve"
nars radiant creamy concealer "vanilla"
mac paint pot "painterly"
nars light reflecting setting powder [pressed]

the eyes ::
nars e/s "euphrate" [greenish-silver]
nars e.s "eurydice" [shimmery charcoal grey side]
nars e/s "demon lover" [hyacinth blue side]
mac e/s "crystal avalanche" [shimmery white]
urban decay 24/7 e/l "zero" [soft black]
ysl baby doll mascara

the cheeks ::
mac powder blush "dollymix" [bright shimmering candy pink]
mac beauty powder "play it proper" [white-pink highlighter]

the lips ::
guerlain rouge automatique "shalimar" [bright cool fuchsia-pink]

since i've been classifying looks by sci/art criteria recently, i'd say that this is unequivocally a winter look, either a bright winter [particularly if you take my shirt into consideration] or a true winter. all of the elements used are cool-toned here- there's no trace of warmth anywhere.

"euphrate" is available wherever nars is sold. and always will be, forever and ever.

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