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there can be only one

yes, it's been cold. how cold? if you haven't lived through it, i could not possibly find words in any language that would make it comprehensible to you how cold it's been. it's so cold that even talking about it makes me feel cold. it's so cold that hell freezing over would be bikini weather. 

but this is a post about hair.

wait, what? 

the thing is, the air has been so dry lately that it's made me acutely aware of how dry my follicles have become, which is pretty desperate. yes, i know they'll bounce back when the spring arrives, but that's like a hundred years from now. and yes, i know that there's nothing wrong with me that a little trimming of dead ends couldn't fix, but i honestly think that i need all the insulation i can get. right now, i'm supremely irritated at how i feel static-y and brittle and crunchy and i want something done about it. 

feeling that dryness has made me wonder if i wouldn't be better off going back to my previous incarnation as a raven-haired lady. although i've spent most of my adult life blonde, a few years back i took the leap from super-light blonde to black overnight [on a work night, too, just to confuse my coworkers] and the reaction seemed good. 

but after a while, i started to long once more for the fresh, optimistic look of lighter locks. 

now, of course, i'm thinking that maybe i'd like to return to darker days. 

the advantages of blonde? it's more what i'm used to, it seems more popular in general, it does make me look a little younger, there's room for experimentation with different tints. 

the disadvantages of blonde? it's hell on my hair- something which is exceptionally noticeable right now, it requires a lot of maintenance since my natural colour is significantly darker.

the advantages of black? it really makes my eyes look cool- i can't count the number of people who mentioned this to me; it also makes my skin look pretty flawless, since it seems to downplay any undue redness; it's pretty low-maintenance because my roots aren't that visible.

the disadvantages of black? there's no getting around the fact that it makes me look older, most people i know seemed to prefer the blonde, it can look kind of flat since there's no difference in tones. 

when i mentioned offhandedly to one of my favourites nars makeup artists that i wasn't sure i liked blonde and was thinking of going back to black, he basically stopped attending to the lady whose makeup he was doing, scowled at me and said "buy wigs". 

and i'm not opposed to that. i like wigs. i have a couple, included a very cute pink one i occasionally wear for nights out. 

but i need to make a decision on day-to-day wear. 

and, like a typical libra, i'm not good at decisions. 

one thing i do know is that, having taken most of the year to go from black to blonde, if i do opt to go back to the dark side, that's it. i can't put my hair through that again and i really didn't like any of the stages in between. [ok, i did kind of like the initial "lava head" look because it was pretty cool, but it would also be impossible to maintain.] browns of any shade seem to contrast with my skin tone too much. i've tried red a half a dozen times and it's nice, but it's too hard to maintain. 

so help me out here people, there can be only one: which is the better kate:



and yes, i totally chose those photos because my makeup is almost exactly the same. 

Comments

Ooh, I like the black! I could be a bit biased though because I have natural black hair. I just love how gorgeous your skin looks in that picture with the black.
Eric B said…
black...but you know I will said that....
Eric B said…
Black ( you already known I will said that....)
Kate MacDonald said…
No worries about bias :-) And, yes, one of the first things I remember noticing about having dark hair was that it immediately made any flaws in my skin less obvious...

Funny, because I naturally think of myself as blonde, but I got used to dark hair very quickly.
ElvenEyes said…
I've always loved your hair dark. I think it looks more you. More character, more mysterious, more noir. :)

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