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friday favourites 08.06.12

image of the week
well i'm having an allergic reaction to something. god knows what it is, but if he does, he's the only one. allergies generally attack me as a very unpleasant and generalised itching, it's no fun, believe me.

thankfully, the euro cup started today, which means i'll likely spend a lot of the next three weeks drinking stout for breakfast, which tends to numb my nerve endings enough to put the itching out of mind. i'm strangely proud of the fact that i called both games correctly today, although i was off on the extent of russia's victory. if this persists [hint: it never does], look for a german- dutch finale. most people seem to be favouring world cup champions spain to repeat, but i think that the germans are just getting beyond fed up with coming up short. was sort of hoping at this point to be able to upload my bracket, but blogger doesn't seem to be quite there yet. in the meantime, i think that both the netherlands and germany will win tomorrow. [personally, i'm kind of pulling for ireland, but given the competition in their group, i don't even see them scoring a point.]

in lieu of a euro bracket, here's some other things that made me smile this week...

good news :: things i can't make up from around the internet

love veal but have a hard time dealing with the cruelty involved in producing it? now there's an alternative so close you might not even notice the difference: your neighbours.

turns out, getting off drugs could be more hazardous to your health than originally thought. especially in mexico.

it's the classic dilemma: you've been picked up for shoplifting at wal-mart and left in the detention room while the managers and security try to figure out what to do with you. how do you kill that time? by making meth, of course.

i'd like to point out that this is the second "morbidly obese corpse burns down crematorium" story from a german-speaking country that's made it to friday favourites. [thanks to dom for finding that one and thinking of me.]

goings on :: stuff you can [and should] participate in


if you're in montreal... i'm not sure who started the tradition of the zombie walk [mostly because i'm too lazy to look it up], but there's an event for the whole zombie family this sunday at the terasse st- ambroise [attached to the st-ambroise brewery]. come prepared to live-and-dead it up and send more paramedics. details here.

there's no way you can tell me you have something more interesting planned for next friday [the 15th] than going to see a sound art installation made with metal, candles and dry ice performed in an old foundry.

if you're in detroit... how do you honour the 75th anniversary of walt disney's classic animated version of "snow white"? you invite more than 80 artists from around the world to do their own interpretation of it in a show dubbed "poisoned apples". the opening is tomorrow, saturday june 9th and you can find details on the web site of the funhouse gallery.

if you're in seattle... swing by the roq larue gallery tonight for the opening of their show around the ancient theme of "death and the maiden". i adore jessica joslin's whimsical steampunk creatures [if i had a child, i'd get her to make a mobile for above its crib, which is probably one more reason why it's a good thing i never had kids] and the world's best-known day of the dead artist, sylvia ji, is also among those participating. details can be found on the gallery home page.

musical notes


well heck, speaking of death and the maiden, here's franz schubert's take on it...



follow-up and shameless self-promotion


well, as it turns out, someone did turn luka magnotta into police in berlin and they didn't even need the incentive of a free book to do so. godspeed you, sir. the montreal police are saying that it could be years before they're able to extradite this twat, but since he's likely to stay in custody there, i really don't see a problem. i'm not particular about where he rots in jail, or about which country's criminals pound his surgically altered face into a wall.

speaking of magnotta, this week's most-read post was "mental health mondays :: bipolar opposites", which i take as a hint that perhaps i should be trying to bring that feature back a little more regularly. [also, searches on various mental health drugs and disorders have been among the most popular leading to this blog for a month or so... basically since the interest in republican candidates and gay porn tailed off]. i'm currently looking into doing a piece on the facts behind omega-3s and whether they really are an alternative to traditional medications for people with mental disorders.

and this week, i'll be putting work into episode 4 of "more like space radio". let me know if there's anything you'd like to hear included. i doubt i'll have the show up before next weekend, but it's definitely in the planning stages.

kitteh of the week


one of the harshest adjustments in going back to work outside the house is that i no longer get to spend the entire day with my kids. on wednesday, when i had both work and the caustic lounge and then a few hours sleep before going back to work, it felt like i didn't see them at all. but sometimes, when i wake up in the morning or during the night, i catch a glimpse and i know that they're always nearby, keeping an eye on me even when i don't notice...



oh and in case you're wondering, the image of the week is apparently a statement on a german political party. or possibly a teaser for an upcoming german porno. it's hard to tell.

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losers?

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trump also said, repeatedly, that america needed to invest heavily …

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don't speak

you might think that it sounds dramatic, but linguistic genocide is something that happens. people in power will go to great lengths to eradicate certain languages, not just for the sheer joy of making the world a lesser place, but as a way of beating down the culture that's associated with it. language has a unique reciprocal bond with culture, and every group that has attempted to break down another has recognised that forbidding a cultural group from communicating in their own language is an extremely effective way to tear apart their culture.

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devastation :: the native north american languages :: it should come as no surprise that the largest genocide in history [by a ma…