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friday favourites 25.05.12

image of the week
holy carp. ladies and gentlemen, i would just like to say that making the transition from your schedule being whatever you feel like making it back to the workaday world is really, really tough. especially if you happen to spend the four days before you go back to work making sure that you don't ever go to sleep before the sun is up. i think that everyone should do that. after all, if their first impression of you is that you're a zombie and a bit of a drooling mouth breather, you can't help but look awesome later on, right?

actually, i have to say, so far so good. although i feel like my job is judging me and my unhealthy habits, because my new company is very healthy. and i don't mean that my coworkers are judging me, because they seem like a pretty non-judgmental lot. i mean the actual job has a sort of disapproving eye pointed at me. i'm being judged by something that isn't even a concrete thing. talk to me when you have physical form, asshole!

here are a few things that made the flurry of the last week a little more memorable.

good news :: stuff i can't make up from around the internet


in the midst of all the controversy and protests going on in montreal and throughout quebec, am i the only person who noticed that our provincial government website is call "assnat"? oh, and if you were trying to verify that last saturday, you couldn't.

just because your skinny jeans are trying to kill you doesn't mean i want to see your ass hanging out of the baggy ones.

if the expression "talent borrows, genius steals" is true, then jay leno and nbc are true geniuses. also complete dickheads.

this should really be about a half hour long, at least.



goings on :: stuff you can [and should] participate in


if you're in montreal... come wish a happy birthday to the ska boss! fred from rude mechanikals is celebrating his big day in style at bar l'absynthe tomorrow, saturday may 26th. would it surprise you to know that there will be live sets by slater et fils [formerly slater's sons] and les happycuriens [best. name. ever.]? i didn't think it would.

and of course, montreal's ever-expanding festival of music and technology, mutek, gets under way this week. it's a massive series of events and chances are that there will be at least a couple of things worth checking out. you can plan your time there through their web site, or with their phone app, which is really the most useful way to do anything these days.

if you're in toronto... come for a walk! urban exploration walk 5.0 will be examining some of toronto's urban art treasures cleverly hidden in the middle of downtown, where millions of people walk by them without noticing every day. this is an awesome initiative to get people to know their city. details here.

musical notes


well, after last weekend, i have to say that i've been inclined mostly to listen to music that features no keyboards at all. but that's actually kind of difficult in my collection. i have been loving the album "the horror" by pop 1280 this week...



follow-up and shameless self-promotion


nothing. really, aside from the fact that i once again failed to post the radio show, there's really nothing to report.

well, if you want to consider it follow-up, there have been minor protest incidents in the form of groups of ten or fewer banging on pots and pans on my corner, which is funny mostly because they're so much quieter than the idiots who honk in emphatically almost every day [but especially on weekends] because they evidently believe that car horns can unblock traffic jams.

radio show this week. seriously.

kitteh of the week


simon is normally a super-model, but we can't all look our best all the time...


thanks very much for reading!

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as long as you're here, why not read more?

losers?

just a short time ago, i waxed prosaic about trump supporters who felt betrayed by their candidate pursuing in office the exact things that he said he would. short version: i have no sympathy.

today is a bit different. in the wake of america's bombing of a syrian air strip, in response to a chemical weapons attack by the syrian government, my facebook and twitter feeds were peppered with plaintive shades of "we believed you". these are the people who heard trump say that he wanted the united states to step back and focus on defending its own. indeed, trump did say such things, over and over; america cannot be the policeman of the world. even arch-liberal cynics like me had to admit that this was a refreshing argument to hear from someone outside the paul family, and, could easily have been turned into trump's greatest argument against hillary clinton. [he chose to go another way, which also worked.]

trump also said, repeatedly, that america needed to invest heavily …

long division

after the united states election last year, there were the usual calls for the country to unite behind the new president. that never happens anymore, because, since george w. bush scored a victory in 2004, having launched the country into a war in iraq for no reason, the people on the losing side of a presidential election have been pretty bloody angry about it. democrats hated bush 43. republicans really hated obama. democrats really hate trump.

it didn't help that trump didn't make the typical conciliatory gestures like including a couple of members of the opposite party in his cabinet, or encouraging his party to proceed slowly with contentious legislation. barack obama arguably wasted at least two and as many as six years of his tenure as president trying to play peacemaker before he felt sufficiently safe to just say "screw you guys" and start governing around the ridiculous congress he was forced to deal with. not-giving-a-shit obama was the best president in …

don't speak

you might think that it sounds dramatic, but linguistic genocide is something that happens. people in power will go to great lengths to eradicate certain languages, not just for the sheer joy of making the world a lesser place, but as a way of beating down the culture that's associated with it. language has a unique reciprocal bond with culture, and every group that has attempted to break down another has recognised that forbidding a cultural group from communicating in their own language is an extremely effective way to tear apart their culture.

there are lots [and lots and lots and lots] of examples of this sort of thing, some successful, some not, but far too many to cover in one blog post. however, i thought it was worth looking at some languages that have been the subjects of active repression, and what the political consequences of that have been.

devastation :: the native north american languages :: it should come as no surprise that the largest genocide in history [by a ma…