Skip to main content

rough ride [movie review :: drive]

when i first saw the trailer for "drive" and heard that the man at its helm, dane nicholas winding refn, had been honoured at cannes with both a standing ovation and an award for best director, my first thought was "really?" because to me, the trailer looked like it could have been made for any slick action-noir, something made to draw in the slightly edgier summer blockbuster audience, but hardly the sort of thing that would wow critics. according to dom, however, who's much more plugged in to the goings-on of the film industry, the word was that "drive" was really something special, something potentially revolutionary that would mark cinema for years to come. i have to admit that, although i usually take what he says very seriously, i was still kind of skeptical. i finally convinced myself that it must simply have been the victim of a highly unimaginative trailer and that i was getting the wrong message.

as soon as the film starts, it's difficult not to immediately be struck by its visual language. winding refn has described his project as a sort of fairytale and, certainly, the setting seems to be some neverland-ish view of modern los angeles, all contrasts of garish lighting and shadows, human figures scuttling through it like foraging rats. against this, ryan gosling's nameless protagonist glides with a steely calm that illustrates his darwinian superiority- he has adapted to the conditions of life in this world and found a way to flourish.

well, flourish might be an understatement. as the film's credits roll, we find out [if we haven't already found out through the trailer] that he works as a mercenary getaway driver for criminals who are willing to pay his price and abide by his strict rules. the initial sequence, where he chauffeurs a couple of stress-addled thieves from the scene of their crime, is a flourish of directorial brilliance. it serves to immediately submerge the audience in the driver's world, but it's also a perfect introduction to the character himself. one of the film's only car chase scenes, it is less about battles of speed or force than it is a study of his methodical intelligence, where everything, even the radio he listens to, serves a purpose. by the end of the sequence, we know as much about the central character as we might in an hour of hearing him speak.

of course, we also soon find out that he has a daytime existence as well, where he works as a mechanic in a specialist's garage and does stunt driving for movies, in partnership with a gimpy father figure who dreams of achieving financial success for both of them through professional car racing. he lives a monastic sort of existence in a spartan apartment, where his connection to the "real world" is found in the form of a wordless, boyish crush on his neighbour, carey mulligan.

in contrast to his young protege, gosling's mentor is verbose, constantly and ill-advisedly talking, especially to gangster bernie rose, played by albert brooks in a much-lauded performance.

from these seeds, we can see clearly where things are heading: the driver's success is a product of his hermitic lifestyle and as circumstances conspire to link him to the outside world, things become more and more problematic.

to his credit, winding refn takes exquisite care in crafting his scenario. although it's clear that there's tension ahead and what its catalysts will be, "drive" takes its time, allowing us to enjoy the ride. the atmosphere created is like an unpleasant dream; you know that something is wrong, even though the unease has not yet resolved itself into visible form.

however, from the moment events start to rain down on the characters we've come to know, the film seems to lose its way. its stylishness, which does such a great job in augmenting the unreal atmosphere for the first part of the film, grows shallow as it degenerates into a sort of muddled crime-gone-bad caper. as much as the first part of the film promises that, even though we know what's going to happen, the filmmakers will find a way to surprise us, the last section falls a bit flat as we realise that we knew where things were headed all along.

"drive" has much to recommend it. it's a lush feast of visuals and is worth watching for this alone. gosling is solid as the controlled anti-hero whose repressed emotions are constantly threatening to erupt and ruin everything. mulligan is his perfect counterpart, sweet but with a martyr's sense of duty and a similar need for control and stability.

brooks, always under-rated as an actor, is a lot less terrifying than early reviews had lead me to believe. rather than being vicious and without conscience, he comes off more as an unbendingly pragmatic middle manager, someone who works within corporate rules, even though that corporation is a criminal syndicate. his performance, while spot-on, is representative of the film's confusion: is his character an actor behaving as he must in a world of pre-ordained effects or is he the real villain in the director's dark fairytale? the former would be an original angle, but it seems like he is supposed to be the latter and things fall a bit short.

"drive" isn't a typical action film by any means. it's clearly more linked to moody, often unsettling works like "the krays", "no country for old men" and "taxi driver", whose influence looms large over every part of refn's opus. it's easily enjoyed, moderately smart and stunning to behold, but it is not a cinematic revolution.

"drive" is currently available on blu-ray and dvd. it's nominated for an academy award for achievement in sound editing.

Comments

Alyssa said…
Great review! I have read many good things about Drive in other blogs and now based on what I have read in yours, I definitely think it is time I check it out. It sounds like a very intriguing movie and the fact Ryan Gosling is in it does not hurt either, lol. I saw that it was available on PPV in HD through my Dish subscription, so I think I will watch it that way. I’m actually glad I waited until it became available in HD because honestly with the prices of movies these days and the picture quality in theaters, I feel I get greater quality in my HDTV and Dish subscription than I would in the movie theater. I don’t know if it’s just me, but I guess it’s the beauty of at home technology. A couple of my co-workers at Dish recommended I check out The Ides of March too since it also stars Ryan, do you think it is worth ordering as well?
Kate MacDonald said…
Thanks Alyssa, I'm glad you enjoyed it! I have to admit that I rarely go to theatres any more. It just seems like a much better deal to watch at home, where I can have the best seat, no one will talk around me, I can eat what I want and I can pause the film if I have to.

Ides of March is good- Gosling is excellent in it as well :-))- but I preferred Drive overall. I actually did a review of The Ides of March as well:

http://morelikespace.blogspot.com/2011/11/hypothetical-situation-room-movie.html

as long as you're here, why not read more?

long division

after the united states election last year, there were the usual calls for the country to unite behind the new president. that never happens anymore, because, since george w. bush scored a victory in 2004, having launched the country into a war in iraq for no reason, the people on the losing side of a presidential election have been pretty bloody angry about it. democrats hated bush 43. republicans really hated obama. democrats really hate trump.

it didn't help that trump didn't make the typical conciliatory gestures like including a couple of members of the opposite party in his cabinet, or encouraging his party to proceed slowly with contentious legislation. barack obama arguably wasted at least two and as many as six years of his tenure as president trying to play peacemaker before he felt sufficiently safe to just say "screw you guys" and start governing around the ridiculous congress he was forced to deal with. not-giving-a-shit obama was the best president in …

making faces :: i could maybe not buy this one thing

i've been into makeup on some level for a long time- much longer than i've been writing about it, for certain. even as a young woman, i loved the feeling of i got from applying a deep-hued lipstick and some mascara. it took years for me to figure out eyeshadow, and even longer for me to appreciate blush. but at this point, i think we can agree that i'm pretty much into the whole gamut. [except liquid and super-matte lipsticks, and most very sparkly eyeshadows. but that's because they're painful for me to wear.]

the thing about spending a long time collecting and holding onto just about everything is that you accumulate quite a stash. lately, i'm trying to force myself to think about what i already have before laying down money for something new. most recently, i found myself drawn to the modern renaissance palette from anastasia. me and a lot of people. by the time i started thinking about it, it was already sold out in my local sephora and online. i signed up…

when you want a great pair

i have finally come to the realisation that i might be trying to learn too many languages at once. that's not to say that i don't want to learn all the languages that exist in written form, but spreading myself across a dozen at one time doesn't allow for a lot of progress in any of them. therefore, while i'm still "checking in" with all of them, i'm trying to focus on a couple at a time. lately, that's been swedish and norwegian, because they are both grammatically similar to english [even if the swedish accent is very tough for me], which makes things progress faster. in general, i've been trying to pair similar languages because, while it can get a bit confusing, building the skill sets of both at once strengthens each of them. if you want more bang for your linguistic buck, 'pairing' like this can be quite helpful. here's a few suggestions for ones that i'd recommend:

swedish and norwegian :: they are so similar, it's easy …