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the montreal metro project, part 7

i hadn't posted a new installment of this in a while, but there are still more photos from the metro system! this is actually the second-last installment and features stations from the western end of the green line- the part to the west of the downtown section.

i'll admit, this is an area of the city that i know very little about, probably because it's largely residential and i've never lived there, nor had any close friends who lived there. like its east-end counterpart, it tends to be traditionally working class, although parts of it are starting to lose a touch of their traditional grit. the neighbourhood of verdun, which makes up much of the territory covered by the green line, used to be known as the borough of choice for the hell's angels, back when the biker wars were in full force.

although it's not what you'd call "hip", the area does boast large apartments at prices lower than much of the rest of the city and, since it's on the metro line, i'd say it's only a matter of time before gentrification starts to take hold.

this is charlevoix station, which is supposedly the deepest station on the network. however, i don't think that is measuring the depth of the station below the ground, but the depth of the station compared to sea level. it's in the neighbourhood of pointe-st-charles, one of montreal's poorest, which exists in a sort of hollow, so that its denizens are always looking up at the rest of the city.



next along the line, we have lasalle station, which competes with de la savane as my favourite on the whole network. seriously, just look at these photos... it's that surreal and disorienting and wonderfully strange when you're in it as well. and, in the third photo, you can see how the entrance is flooded with natural light. win.

 
 
by contrast, metro de l'eglise isn't quite so exciting, although it is located in an oddly trendy strip of verdun, lined with indie coffee shops and cute restaurants. and it does have some interesting cement architecture, particularly around the escalators.






this is verdun metro, which has pretty eye-catching architecture. it's also the only station where i was forced to stop taking photographs because i didn't have a permit...


jolicoeur metro, which is kind of cool with its bright orange accents on the platform...


... but really nice with its sunlit  mezzanine.


the wavy walls at monk metro make me feel slightly like i've eaten something i shouldn't have. or am having a flashback to when i ate something i shouldn't have in my youth.



but the real story here is upstairs... seriously, these things are bizarre and made of awesome. i tried to capture just how big the giant stick people from another planet are, because believe me, they're huge. they tower over you looking like a hybrid of a human and a praying mantis from another dimension, making you feel vaguely like they're about to reach down and start playing volleyball with your head. or someone else's head, if you're lucky.




these last two are shots of angrignon station, the western terminus of the green line. you can easily see what this station has going for it: natural light and lots of it. it also opens on one side to a large park where you can frolic in nature before zipping back to the city. the station is at the border between the boroughs of verdun to the east and lasalle to the west. lasalle is generally considered the gateway to the west island suburbs, which are entirely cut off from metro service. 



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