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the montreal metro project, part 2

here's another installment of "the montreal metro project", a series of photographs i took of all the metro stations in montreal. yes, i frequently have a lot of time on my hands.

the blue line, often forgotten because it crosses nowhere near downtown, actually has some of the nicest stations on the network. these shots are taken from the université de montreal stop.





i got all artsy and wanted to take reflective shots at metro lionel groulx, one of the network's "connector" stations where multiple lines cross over. 



metro place-st-henri is notable for its cavernous depth more than anything else, although it also has a nifty skylight patterned like a snowflake and a strangely isolated statue of the man for whom the station [and the adjacent neighbourhood] is named [who wasn't a saint himself, but one with a saintly name]. 






george vanier station holds the distinction of being the only one on the network that has no bus service. every other station has at least one bus that stops there to ferry commuters to nearby locations lacking their own metro stop. not this one.

why do i know this? because the bus service was stopped right around the time that i first moved to montreal and it was a big deal in the local media for about ten minutes. a long time later, the residents of petit-bourgogne have only a dim memory of bus service and i know one more useless fact. [oh, it's also the second-least used station on the network. and it has the amazing cement "light tree" statue you see below.]




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