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friday favourites 18.11.11

whoa. it has just been impossible to shut me up this month. i'm looking at the number of posts i've done thus far in november and i'm sort of wondering if i need to get out more. or find a hobby that involves using my hands for things other than typing. so since you've all been very sweet about indulging my near-constant ranting, i'll try to keep things brief for this edition of friday favourites.

the home team :: back when i was first getting on the internet, i was a broke student [as opposed to a broke adult] and the only reason i was able to get on line when i did [especially after i graduated] was because halifax had one of the earliest freenet [means exactly what it sounds like] services in the country, chebucto community net. it was back in the days when email addresses were a little challenging [web site addresses even more so] and i remember my moniker was "ak" followed by a bunch of numbers. [not, unfortunately, "ak-47" which would have been all sorts of awesome, but something much less memorable. which is why i can't remember it.] although i've long since moved away and had many other email accounts, it gives me a warm sense of happiness that chebucto is still around, still providing low-cost, reliable access for those who need it. as with every community-based group, they rely a lot on volunteer help and local support, so feel free to lend a hand if you're in the area, or give them a virtual fist bump by following their entertaining twitter feed or joining their new facebook page.

newcomers :: i decided to try out feedburner on the blog earlier this week and, although i don't quite understand how it works or what it's doing, that has never stopped me from using any service before. i'm a sort of figure-it-out-as-i-go-along kind of girl. i have noticed that there has been a lot of new traffic on the site, which is ultimately what i hoped would happen when i signed up. so, if you haven't been here before, welcome. please feel free to look around, give yourself a little tour [i recommend starting in the "about me" chamber] and sample the wares. nothing is booby-trapped. nothing is poisoned. as far as you know.

david cross :: i knew him chiefly as the sexually repressed "blowhard" dr. tobias funke on "arrested development", but as it turns out, the man is actually a hilarious stand-up comedian. here's a slightly older bit, recording just a few months after 9/11 [meaning before things started to get unbelievably stupid].



and to wrap things up [see? i said i'd keep things short- for me], here's a quick kitty shot i look at to remind me of everything my furbabies bring into my life when i'm feeling particularly bleak.



have a great week everyone and thanks to all of you for reading.

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losers?

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trump also said, repeatedly, that america needed to invest heavily …

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after the united states election last year, there were the usual calls for the country to unite behind the new president. that never happens anymore, because, since george w. bush scored a victory in 2004, having launched the country into a war in iraq for no reason, the people on the losing side of a presidential election have been pretty bloody angry about it. democrats hated bush 43. republicans really hated obama. democrats really hate trump.

it didn't help that trump didn't make the typical conciliatory gestures like including a couple of members of the opposite party in his cabinet, or encouraging his party to proceed slowly with contentious legislation. barack obama arguably wasted at least two and as many as six years of his tenure as president trying to play peacemaker before he felt sufficiently safe to just say "screw you guys" and start governing around the ridiculous congress he was forced to deal with. not-giving-a-shit obama was the best president in …

don't speak

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devastation :: the native north american languages :: it should come as no surprise that the largest genocide in history [by a ma…