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friday favourites :: 26.08.11

well, we lost jack layton this week and there's a hurricane bearing down on the east coast that looks set to inflict some serious damage, so this truly isn't the best week to think of favourites. on the other hand, as i sit here at my desk, observing a sky so grey and dreary, i realise that it's probably one of those times when thinking of the things that help boost your spirits is that much more important. so think of something that made you smile this week and join me for a quick look at the things that kept my chin up...

wiki works :: further to my comments on christie blatchford, the national post and why the media was so quick to condemn jack layton [original, post-election observations here], it does please me to know that the sports writer-turned-political-commentator won't find it so easy to put that debacle behind her. some thoughtful person saw fit to edit her wikipedia entry to include mention of the controversy over her remarks. the system works. [others have not been so kind.]

MORE FAVOURITES AND THE CAT PIC OF THE WEEK AFTER THE BREAK...



going underground :: i am a big supporter of public transit. although i can and often have driven, i strongly prefer to get around without one. unfortunately, this apparently puts me in a significant minority in canada, despite the fact that our population is hugely skewed towards urban centres. i do consider myself lucky to live in a city that puts more effort into getting its population from a to b than most. while it's far from perfect, montreal's system is vastly superior to those in the two other cities i've called home [halifax and toronto]. and the jewel in its proverbial crown is its metro [subway to the rest of you] system.

and i'm glad to see that i'm not alone in my admiration. matt mclaughlin has created "montreal by metro"/ "metro de montreal", a web site dedicated to the system, including its complete history, user information, statistics [i actually used his information to select which metro station we should shoot scenes from "conversion" in and it served me well] and about the metro's art and architecture. unlike almost every other system in the western world, where metro stations are built on two or three set plans, each one of montreal's stations is unique and features work from world-renown artists. [if you'd like to have a look, you can see a little photography project i did, taking pictures of every station on the system here, here and here.]

hint :: less crayons, more therapy
you laughed, admit it :: ok, i realise that this is going to result in me losing every single friend i have who is also a parent, but in my defense, i'd like to say that 1. i know my art was at least as bad as this [and still is]; 2. i'm probably just working out some of the issues i had with kids when i was one and most of them picked on me mercilessly [as opposed to now, when the internet allows me to hide behind a carefully crafted persona that's comfortable making cracks about her awkward past]; and 3. i am certain that all of you have been presented with a piece of your child's art and wondered what the hell was going through their little heads. so lighten up already. [of course, if you did like it, you should also check out the original for this sort of site "i am better than your kids".]

that about does it for this week's high points. feel free to share some of your own in the interests of raising the overall level of happy in the universe. i do hope that the threats of imminent tornado death are overstated, since the world really doesn't need more bad news this week.

i'll leave you with a quick shot of the one kind of computer pop-up i've learned to love. i swear, he does this all the time.


Comments

Biba said…
I wouldn't mind this kind of pop-ups either :)

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