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mental health mondays :: pop quiz

those of you who are friends of mine on facebook [that might look a little weird to those of you seeing this post on facebook] may have seen my weekly "sunday quiz time", where i just ask random questions in the name of stimulating conversation. after doing that this week, i ended up taking a very wide variety of quizzes on mental floss, which made me a little smug about my knowledge of geography and a little rattled about my knowledge of the finer points of grammar. [i want to say, in my defense, that the one grammar quiz i found was really f**king hard. is that last sentence grammatically correct? i don't know. i have no confidence in my grammar anymore.]

i got so into answering questions about just about anything that i thought it might be fun to apply that format to mental health mondays. i've already done links to quizzes about various mental disorders and how to tell if you have them [i think it turned out i had all of them], but i wanted to do a special set of questions on some of the various issues that i've touched on thus far.

of course, if you want to, you can just google these questions and come up with the answers that way. but you could also just take a stab at answering them "au naturel" [meaning with your brain power- i don't care if you're doing it naked] and hang on until next week, when i'll be posting the responses. leaving your answers in the comments section here is highly encouraged. it's more fun that way...

1. the diagnostic and statistical manual of mental disorders [dsm] is the american psychiatric association's bible when it comes to defining the particularities of abnormal psychology. the manual divides conditions into categories called axes, with axis i being the most serious- conditions requiring clinical attention. which of the following is not an axis i mental disorder:

- anorexia nervosa
- bipolar ii disorder
- primary insomnia
- schizoid personality disorder

2. related to the dsm again, it is currently on a text revision of its fourth edition [given the snappy abbreviation dsm-iv-tr]. the new & improved dsm-5 [they're ditching the roman numeral] is due out in may 2013. the first "draft" of dsm-5 recommended the creation of a new category of disorder called "behavioural addictions", with gambling as the sole category member. what other addiction was considered for inclusion, but ultimately ended up being relegated to an appendix due to a lack of data?

3. this condition lost its status as a mental disorder in 1973.

4. estimated to be the most common of the personality disorders, this controversial condition is diagnosed three times as often in women as in men.

5. it is estimated that schizophrenia affects 0.4% of the world's population. what percentage is estimated to have antisocial personality disorder [formerly known as psychopathy]?

6. only one medication used in the treatment of mental disorders made it onto the 2010 forbes listing of the top 15 most prescribed drugs in america. coming in at #12, it's the generic version of this benzodiazepine.

7. the most commonly used medications in the treatment of bipolar disorder are mood stabilisers. however, almost all the drugs used as mood stabilisers actually fall under another classification and were developed for the treatment of a different condition. what condition is it?

8. in the tradition of finding new uses for existing drugs, this synthetic steroid developed in the 1980s by the roussel uclaf pharmaceutical company has performed surprisingly well in small-scale, early phase testing for treating psychotic depression and bipolar disorder.

so that's it. as i said, the answers will be posted [with comments] next week. feel free to post your responses here, or send them to me directly [info@fsquaredmedia.net].

Comments

krankenstein said…
for my cycling bipolar (which reminds me of alfred jarry's "the passion of christ as an uphill bicyle race") my psyc. prescribed lamictal, after trying lithium which was awful. part of the prescription process also has to do with cost: it troubles me how much the manufacturers are making $.

i'm also on benzodizapine which helps with some chronic anxiety...

also diagnosed with ADD - first was on concerta but changed to generic cuz of $

it is largely assumed that such conditions as these are "pathological" and individual, when any thinking person (and by that i don't mean smart i.q. but "aware", empathetic, and sensitive of what the world around them considers "normal" that is, not "pathological") is enough to make thoughts whirl and moods swing.
flora_mundi said…
The cost of psychiatric drugs is shocking, particularly when you consider that people with serious mental disorders are often marginalised financially to begin with.

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