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Showing posts from April, 2010

ok, so now what's wrong with me?

a few weeks ago, i sprained my ankle. despite the fact that i wear big girl heels a lot of the time and had been out the night before wearing one of my most skyscraper-like talons, i managed to sprain my ankle walking in bare feet on the wood floor of my bedroom. i don't even know what happened, but all of a sudden my ankle was perpendicular to my tibia and i felt a shot of pain.

in retrospect, it might have been better if i had felt a lot of pain, because, when that initial shot subsided, i went merrily about my way assuming i'd just clumsily turned my ankle, as i am wont to do and there was nothing more to it. in fact, i was dj'ing that night, so i went out, did my dj set, danced to the other sets, strolled down to chinatown to get a late night/ early morning snack (well, a little more than a snack, actually) and, the next morning, was sort of astonished to see that my right ankle looked like i'd stored a baseball inside it. it was sort of nice and round and firm and…

scapegoat, shame on you

i'm not catholic. i wasn't raised catholic, i've never considered converting to catholicism. i live with a catholic and have friends who grew up in catholic. i've attended one catholic service (midnight mass at the notre dame basilica, and i recommend the experience to anyone). my exposure to catholicism has been enough to convince me that i'm very glad my paternal great-grandmother took it upon herself to convert her entire family to protestantism while her husband was off sailing tall ships around the world and couldn't argue with her. in short, catholicism scares me.

as if the constant bludgeoning of churchgoers with guilt and sin wasn't enough to cause permanent damage to those raised in the faith, the last decades have added a new layer of horror: it turns out that a lot of the men who were in charge of doling out the lessons on the wages of sin were sinning pretty massively and pretty flagrantly themselves. that has to be tremendously disillusioning f…

the lively arts

poetry is one of those forms that a lot of people find difficult to evaluate. the difference between william carlos williams and the kid in your grade one class who used to eat his paste can be a very fine one indeed.

people who take poetry seriously and who want to hone their poet's skills have found a new home on the internet, though. there are a plethora of sites where they can receive feedback, constructive criticism and encouragement from their peers. what a relief for those of us who grew up thinking that the poetry gene was inextricably linked to the dying alone and miserable gene.

below, i've excerpted some of the feedback on various poems from one such site, so any of you interested in participating in this sort of forum can see what you're in for. i have removed any names that were given and any reference to the specific site, as i don't want to make it seem like i am targeting one particular forum. no other edits have been made, it's just copy and paste.


parity and prestidigitation

On some level, we all know that we’re sort of getting screwed by retailers. Generally speaking, the larger the retailer, the greater the damage that they can inflict (and no, I’m not going to mention any names). We’ve all made comments to the effect that a retailer or manufacturer makes an item for $2 that ends up retailing for $50. This is, of course, engaging in a little bit of spurious logic that somehow the remaining $48 is finding its way directly into someone’s pocket, which is far from the case. In fact, there are a lot of very good reasons why a $2 product can end up costing $50 in a store, a lot of reasons that we all (without knowing it) want that item to cost $50 in a store- the number of jobs that are supported by its eventual sale, the amount of money driven directly into government coffers by tax on the item that we depend on to pay for our services, etc. I’m not arguing that there isn’t some greed and gouging involved, but there are reasons why we all depend on the econ…