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showtime

this is in response to pelao's question (see comments section from the review of 'racket' below) about which shows i've really enjoyed. here's a rough 'top 3':

#3- legendary pink dots, montreal, foufounes electriques, october 1995- first show i went to see that i really, really wanted to (where i didn't know the band personally). one of the most thrilling moments for me was at the very beginning, actually hearing edward kaspel's wonderfully cartoonish voice coming out of a human being.

#2- merzbow, toronto, the kathedral, september 2002- i was a little concerned this one would be a disappointment, but far from it. almost two solid hours of gut-shaking, teeth-rattling noise. perhaps the most memorable part was that it was beyond hot in the crowded room ad the combination of heat and sound caused a couple of people to pass out.

#1- current 93- toronto, the music gallery, june 2004- awe-inspiring chiefly because it did justice both to the power and the fragility of their music. they played almost every single thing i would have had them play, including a breathtaking version of 'they return to their earth', which was the high point of the performance for me. their music has always had a great emotional impact on me and more than once, i teared up during the night.

Comments

David said…
That Pink Dots show was the best show ever.

It's Number One for me.

Number Two is the Stereolab show we were at in Halifax - that crazy-ass long, noisy version of "Jenny Ondioline" (I think it recall it being close to 45minutes) was just great. I also like the fact that there were maybe 75 people...

Number Three is easily anything done by Wolf Blitzer's Gasmask. It was hypnotic to listen to them play, and they all just got into it, and you could see and feel the energy given off.
flora_mundi said…
well, i'm going to have to thank you for reminding me of a couple of other great live moments... :-)
Geoffrey said…
I get lost in my own work... noorcd.com but today I ventured out and played live, a park, slow summer festival of Make Music NY... mixed acoustic guitar and voice with aprepeggiated keyboard washes, drones, percussion sequences... other people's gigs you ask? Salif Keita did it for real in Harlem last year.
James H. said…
Amazing that anyone even remembers Wolf Blitzer's Gas Mask! Now, if only people remembered Horn of Plenti (at least for that one really good Birdland gig)
David said…
"Horn of Plenti"

I remember them, but not any shows.
flora_mundi said…
i can remember a couple of shows... an excellent one at birdland, which was psychedelic enough to make haight ashbury look straight-laced, and another in the park. ah, memories...
n.w.long said…
Rova/Orchestrova
Electric Ascencion
w/otomo yoshihide, ikue mori, nels cline and others
Easter 2005, SF

Franciso Lopez
san francisco 2001

Pan Sonic
san francisco 2002

Pearl Jam
opening for Red hot chili peppers
Normal, IL
1991

Stevie Ray Vaughn
troy, wisconsin 1989
pelao said…
great list, i am particularly jealous of your current 93 experience...i have missed them out twice in the past three years, will my time ever come?
off the top of my head, three shows i have enjoyed most....SWANS, london 1997,CRAMPS, london 1998, DIAMANDA, vitoria 2007.
Let's see...
Einsturzende Neubauten, at the Spectrum in '95 I think is my number 1. Tightest show I've ever seen.
I'd say that the first two Angels of Light shows I've seen were great. That was before the Akkron Family debacle. To this day, I still wonder what Michael was thinking.
The best crowd pleaser was Clan of Ximox at Foufounes Electriques (the week after that horrid Christian Death show) They played every song you'd think they should play, they looked like they actually wanted to be there and they wanted to play some more. Unfortunately, the management at that club sucks.
For pure raw energy, I'd say the Project Hat/Slogun/Brighter Death Now show in Chicago. What was surprising (especially for Slogun) was how soft the Chicago crowd had gotten (yes, it took 10 minutes before the Wax Trax crowd reacted, and thats because I reacted, after he went after my girlfriend at the time. And I got hit in the head with a beer bottle. Oh, the memories!)

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