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diet diary, part 9


yes, still.

well, it's not so much a diet any more as an adjustment to an overall healthier eating pattern. once you've lost weight (and as of christmas, i had lost upwards of twenty pounds), your body starts doing a lot of the work for you.

for instance, yesterday, the man and i decided to stop at chippy's, toronto's fish and chip nirvana, where your choice of fish (generally haddock, cod, halibut, salmon, scallops or shrimp) is battered before your eyes and served over a pile o' fries. a few hours later, we topped this off by sharing a sinful dark chocolate and banana crepe at the place whose name i don't know, but who are right next to fluevog, so they're easy for me to find. obviously, i'm not obsessing over what i'm eating.

except that i spent most of the night feeling like i was going to be sick. why? because i'm not used to it any more, and stuffing my face with grease and sugar en masse is something that i can no longer handle physically. i don't really need to worry about what it does to my figure...

i still get people commenting on my weight loss, as if i have some pact with the devil, but i have entered a long stage where i don't notice much difference myself. there are a few things that have come to my attention:

1. my face is longer than i had realised. years of being pleasingly plump, plus the normal torture of childhood, had left me with the impression that my face was quite round. the picture adjacent is an illustration of what i'm talking about (albeit one that, i think, exaggerates the effect).

2. i will always have a little bulge in my tummy. although it's shrunk, it just seems to be there for good. whatever.

3. i am two sizes. i am always going to be a full size, possibly two, larger on top than i am on the bottom. again, whatever. can make buying dresses difficult.

so later this week, i have my "annual" (i haven't had one in three years) physical. they will weigh me as a matter of protocol, which is normally something that i dread. this year, i'm still nervous, but i also want to find out what my progress has been. for the first time, i'm thinking that my "goal" (basically, to get to the weight where i felt i looked best, back when i kept better track of my weight) might be in sight.

so what happens then? probably nothing, because i've taken this so slowly that, as i mentioned earlier, i don't really have to think about it any more. but i have a feeling i'll feel pretty good.

Comments

David said…
You hit the nail - once you change your eating lifestyle, you do get used to it, and your body adjusts.

I find myself cooking everything instead of opening a box, or popping a can. I've rediscovered how much fun cooking is, and I have more control over what is in my food.

The flipside is the illness you feel when you eat what you are not used to. I can't eat anything greasy anymore, without feeling sick. Same with a lot of salted processed foods - Boy-ar-dee in a can is a great example - it just makes me feel horrible after eating it.
flora_mundi said…
Of course, I had my annual physical today and I haven't lost any weight since Christmas... Grrrrr... I thought I felt a difference... At least with the somewhat milder weather, I can get outside a little more.

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