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eat the cup, part 10: gertaly

and we’re back. after a weekend in new york enjoying other people’s cooking (and other people’s perspectives on the world cup, as it turns out), it occured to me that the semi-final and final rounds of the cup deserve something a little different. fusion.

so for the coming games, i am going to find ways of combining the two national cuisines of the teams playing. tonight: gertaly.

this evening’s supper featured a risotto, prepared with some onions (the basis of all italian cuisine) broth and sausage. in this case a combination of bratwurst and hot italian sausage, just to be fair. at the end, i swirled in just a little german mustard, to add a different kind of flavour. i have to say... worked out pretty well.

as increasingly happens, today’s battle was pretty epic and ended in the most dramatic fashion possible- a goal in the last minute of the last overtime period. of course, if it were a hollywood drama, the goal would have gone to the home team, so the cameras wouldn’t be forced to pan across thousands of devastated faces, their tears streaking through the black, red and gold of their face paint.

back at home, things are a little different. granted, there have been a couple of cars i’ve seen driving in the last few weeks with flags that would dwarf the reichstag, but in general, the germans haven’t been representing in the same way as their southern opposites. the drive home tonight was the loudest i’v ever experienced. i was surrounded at all points by italian flags and blaring horns (although, mercifully, the noise near my actual home was minimal). most bizarre, there was at least one car that drove past me with a flag displayed ACROSS THE WINDSHIELD. it’s almost too stereotypical: passionate but not particularly wise.

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jihadvertising?

i keep seeing this ad for tictac candies:



am i the only one who finds the suicide bomber clown at the end a little unnerving? all the nice natural things like the bunny and the [extinct] woolly mammoth and the fruit get devoured by a trying-to-appear-nonthreatening-but-obviously-psychotic clown who then blows himself up. congratulations, tictac, i think this ad has landed you on about a dozen watch lists.

oh and by the way, showing me that your product will somehow cause my stomach to explode in a rainbow of wtf makes me believe that doing consuming tictacs would be a worse dietary decision than the time i ate two raw eggs and a half a bottle of hot sauce on a dare.

making faces :: hot stuff, comin' through

i don't even know what to say about the weather. the end of september saw temperatures at a scalding 36c/ 97f outside. this is especially annoying because we've had a moderate summer. most days it rained a little in the morning, the temperatures didn't creep into the 30s too often and there wasn't the normal stretch of a few weeks when it felt like we were living on the sun. now, we've receded into more normal fall weather, although it's still on the warm side for mid-october. that climate change thing is a bitch.

trying to think of something positive in the situation, it does put me in a perfect frame of mind to write about urban decay's naked heat palette. it's the latest in what appears to be an endless series of warm neutral and red eyeshadow palettes that have followed in the footsteps of anastasia's modern renaissance. [which i ultimately decided i didn't need after doing a thorough search of my considerable stash.] i do think that it'…

the portuguese referendum

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but there could have been.

back in the fifteenth century, spain was... nonexistent. the iberian peninsula was divided into several states, each of which considered themselves independent of all the others. you had portugal on the atlantic side. in the centre was the kingdom of castile [which had previously been castile and léon]. in the northeast you had the basque kingdom of navarre [home to one of the many branches of my family tree]. in the south-southwest, you had the muslim caliphate that had once held sway over much of the modern-day spanish territory, but…