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tell me something i don't know...

You scored as agnosticism. You are an agnostic. Though it is generally taken that agnostics neither believe nor disbelieve in God, it is possible to be a theist or atheist in addition to an agnostic. Agnostics don't believe it is possible to prove the existence of God (nor lack thereof).

Agnosticism is a philosophy that God's existence cannot be proven. Some say it is possible to be agnostic and follow a religion; however, one cannot be a devout believer if he or she does not truly believe.

agnosticism

79%
Satanism

63%
Buddhism

58%
Islam

58%
Judaism

50%
Hinduism

46%
Paganism

46%
atheism

42%
Christianity

25%

Which religion is the right one for you? (new version)
created with QuizFarm.com

Comments

qed said…
The questions were in some cases impossible to answer accurately - there were cases where both agreeing and disagreeing summed up my point of view inaccurately.

"Your beliefs most closely resemble those of Satanism! Before you scream, do a bit of research on it. To be a Satanist, you don't actually have to believe in Satan. Satanism generally focuses upon the spiritual advancement of the self, rather than upon submission to a deity or a set of moral codes. Do some research if you immediately think of the satanic cult stereotype. Your beliefs may also resemble those of earth-based religions such as paganism.

Satanism 96%

atheism 83%

Paganism 71%

agnosticism 67%

Buddhism 63%

Judaism 42%

Islam 33%

Hinduism 17%

Christianity 8%"
flora_mundi said…
indeed. i don't think the quiz authors are going to be doing studies for m.i.t. any time soon. i also found it difficult because of the way the questions were worded... i have confidence in my ability to set my own moral compass, but i'm not so sure about other people...
I got satanism too, with strong paganism and budhism following. Not too bad, and as you know me, its actually fairly accurate given the questions that were asked.

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