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eat the cup, part 8


well, i don't really have an option but to pull a repeat today. i've already cooked food from both italy and the ukraine and, as things progress, i'm going to run into this problem more and more.

at first, i was going to go ukrainian, because i felt like i owed them one. while i was in kensington on the weekend, one of the guys there was quizzing me on my predictions for the upcoming games and i had picked switzerland of the ukraine. my logic was that switzerland hadn't allowed a goal yet and no one could beat them if they couldn't score. in point of fact, this is wrong, because goals scored in a shoot out do not count, so you can lose a game without allowing the opposing team a goal. so, sorry about that, ukraine.

on the other hand, i couldn't face the idea of a really heavy meal today, so i went with the easier choice and made a meal of sumer vegetables with balsmic and basil. (this was my attempt at approximating the mind-blowing grilled vegetables at seven numbers.) one of the many things i like about italian cuisine is that it is so flexible. in the middle of winter, i could just as easily find a dish that was as temperature-appropriate.

indeed, there seem to be very few things that italy doesn't excel at, at least in the realm of the senses- art, cinema, various types of music, food, wine... they have a certain dramatic flare. (a few people i know would say that their soccer team uses that dramatic flare just a little too often. when these guys take a hit, you'd think they were acting a hambone macbeth.)

ah well. as orson welles once said: “in italy for thirty years under the borgias they had warfare, terror, murder and bloodshed but they produced michelangelo, leonardo da vinci and the renaissance. in switzerland, they had brotherly love; they had five hundred years of democracy and peace and what did that produce? the cuckoo clock.” and, as it turns out, the world cup seems to be in agreement.

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